Song Lyric Sunday – 11 April 2021 – Sorrow

Jim Adams’ Song Lyric Sunday gives us the chance to share familiar, and sometimes not so familiar, songs. This week we should aim for a song with a one word title.

If you fancy sharing one of your favourite songs you can find out how to participate, and also listen to all the great entries, here.

We’ve had two weeks of love so, to balance things out a little, I’ve opted for Sorrow this week, performed by Pink Floyd.

The video was recorded on 20 October 1994 at Earls Court, London, during The Division Bell Tour. It was originally released on VHS and Laserdisc in 1995 and featured David Gilmour on guitar and vocals. Nick Mason was on drums and percussion, Rick Wright on Hammond organ and synthesiser, Guy Pratt playing bass guitar, Gary Wallis on percussion and extra drums on Pulse,  Tim Renwick on rhythm guitar, and Jon Carin on synthesiser. The ladies providing fantastic support singing are Sam Brown, Durga McBroom, and Claudia Fontaine.

“Sorrow” is the closing track on Pink Floyd’s thirteenth studio album, A Momentary Lapse of Reason, released in 1987.  Drummer Nick Mason stated that the song was almost entirely written by David Gilmour alone over the space of one weekend on his houseboat studio Astoria. When he returned from the weekend, only “some spit and polish” was needed to finish it off. Gilmour has also mentioned that the solo at the end of “Sorrow” was done on the boat, his guitar going through a small Gallien-Krueger amplifier. Sorrow was a poem he’d written as a lyric before he wrote music to it, which was rare for him. 

It takes 3 minutes and 17 seconds before a human voice is heard, that of Dave Gilmour, but that lead in time is filled with the divine voice of Pink Floyd’s 4th singer, Dave’s guitar. 

Sublime!

Sorrow

Pink Floyd

The sweet smell of a great sorrow lies over the land
Plumes of smoke rise and merge into the leaden sky
A man lies and dreams of green fields and rivers
But awakes to a morning with no reason for waking

He’s haunted by the memory of a lost paradise
In his youth or a dream, he can’t be precise
He’s chained forever to a world that’s departed
It’s not enough, it’s not enough

His blood has frozen and curdled with fright
His knees have trembled and given way in the night
His hand has weakened at the moment of truth
His step has faltered

One world, one soul
Time pass, the river roll

And he talks to the river of lost love and dedication
And silent replies that swirl invitation
Flow dark and troubled to an oily sea
A grim intimation of what is to be

There’s an unceasing wind that blows through this night
And there’s dust in my eyes, that blinds my sight
And silence that speaks so much louder than words
Of promises broken

Source: LyricFind

Songwriters: Dave Gilmour

Sorrow lyrics © Concord Music Publishing LLC

Song Lyric Sunday – August 16 2020 – Clear or Cloudy – and now for something completely different!

song-lyric-sundayJim Adams’ Song Lyric Sunday gives us the chance to share familiar, and sometimes not so familiar, songs. I am almost certain that my choice today will count amongst the latter!

If you fancy sharing one of your favourite songs you can find out how to participate, and also listen to all the great entries, here.

Most people, even if they couldn’t say exactly who Sting was, would recognise some of his music. Some will be familiar with his early work with The Police  where he was the lead vocalist, bass guitarist, and main songwriter. The band sold over 75 million records, making them one of the best selling bands of all time.

Sting has also had a hugely successful solo career, and has written and performed in a musical, The Last Ship, inspired by Sting’s own childhood experiences and the shipbuilding industry in Wallsend, Tyne and Wear where he grew up.

Not content with this, he has also collaborated with various artists and musicians on multiple projects, worked on films, sung at President Obama’s inauguration and had his brain scanned whilst performing his music!

In October 2006, he released an album entitled Songs from the Labyrinth featuring the music of John Dowland (an Elizabethan-era composer) and accompaniment from Bosnian lute player Edin Karamazov. Sting’s interpretation of this English Renaissance composer and his cooperation with Edin Karamazov brought recognition in classical music.

Here he is singing………..

Clear or Cloudy

The lyrics are a little olde worlde, I suspect it is to help Sting in his enunciation? You may have noted that he is reading the music as he sings. It is obviously a little complicated!

Cleare or cloudie sweet as April showring, 
Smooth or frowning so is hir face to mee, 
Pleasd or smiling like milde May all flowring, 
When skies blew silke and medowes carpets bee, 
Hir speeches notes of that night bird that singeth, 
Who thought all sweet yet jarring notes outringeth. 

Hir grace like June, when earth and trees bee trimde, 
In best attire of compleat beauties height, 
Hir love againe like sommers daies bee dimde, 
With little cloudes of doubtfull constant faith, 
Hir trust hir doubt, like raine and heat in Skies, 
Gently thundring, she lightning to mine eies. 

Sweet sommer spring that breatheth life and growing, 
In weedes as into herbs and flowers, 
And sees of service divers sorts in sowing, 
Some haply seeming and some being yours, 
Raine on your herbs and flowers that truly serve, 
And let your weeds lack dew and duly starve.

and here singing Come Again

and for anyone who is interested in the derivatives of the Lute, here is a very good introduction.

STOP PRESS

As a late addition I found this alternative version of the song. Quite an interesting comparison.

Song Lyric Sunday – August 9 2020 – A song with a harmonica

song-lyric-sundayJim Adams’ Song Lyric Sunday gives us the chance to share familiar, and sometimes not so familiar, songs.

If you fancy sharing one of your favourite songs you can find out how to participate, and also listen to all the great entries, here.

I had this week’s post all sorted with multiple choices of songs, there are so many to choose from!  Then, on Saturday morning I was listening to BBC Radio 4’s Saturday Live, which includes a section where well known people are asked for their ‘Inheritance Tracks’, that is a song that they have inherited, and a song that they would pass on to future generations. It was the turn of Tony Hadley who was the lead singer of Spandau Ballet. The song he would pass on is Bohemian Rhapsody by Queen. The song he inherited is now my choice for this week, My Boy Lollipop, recorded in 1964 by Millie Small.

Millie was a very bubbly character and gained international success after this record became a hit when she was only 17. She undertook a world tour but was probably encouraged to spend too much time on the road and suffered ill health for a time. By 1968 her popularity in the UK began to decline but as reggae emerged in 1969 she returned to recording for a brief period before her recording career ended and she stepped away from music.  She later lived in Singapore and New Zealand before returning to London, where she concentrated on writing, painting and raising her daughter.

When My Boy Lollipop was re-released in 1987 to mark Island Records’ 25th anniversary, she gave a rare interview to Thames TV, where she revealed she had, at one point, been penniless and sleeping rough in London.  Millie died on 5 May 2020 from a stroke.

We never get to see just who is playing harmonica on this song. Millie always insisted that it was Rod Stewart but he has always denied it.   It was almost certainly either Pete Hogman or Jimmy Powell, both of The Five Dimensions. Pete Hogman and Five Dimensions guitarist Kenny White both maintain it was Pete Hogman, while Jimmy Powell asserts that it was he who played this solo. We shall never know!

My Boy Lollipop

Millie Small

My boy lollipop
You make my heart go giddy up
You are as sweet as candy
You’re my sugar dandy
Ho, ho, my boy lollipop
Never ever leave me
Because it would grieve me
My heart told me so

I love ya, I love ya, I love ya so
But I wanted you to know
I need ya, I need ya, I need ya so
And I’ll never let you go

My boy lollipop
You make my heart go giddy up
You set my world on fire
You are my one desire
My boy lollipop

I love ya, I love ya, I love ya so
But I wanted you to know
I need ya, I need ya, I need ya so
And I’ll never let you go

My boy lollipop
You make my heart go giddy up
You set my world on fire
You are my one desire
Oh, my boy lollipop
Oh, my boy lollipop
My boy lollipop

Source: LyricFind

Songwriters: Johnny Roberts / Morris Levy

My Boy Lollipop lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

Harmonicas have been used in music for many years. Often they were used to tune guitars prior to pitch pipes or auto tuning. Every young man used to imagine they could easily play one. Many tried, and they were a popular Christmas present which parents often quickly regretted.

You may notice that I said young men – I always imagined it was a boy thing rather than a girl thing. I know, I know, it’s the 21st century. Equal opportunities, sexist comments and all that. So I googled lady harmonica players and boy………………..was I wrong. Here’s just one example, which will lead to many more if you get carried away. I hope you enjoy this tremendous virtuosity.

 

Song Lyric Sunday – June 21, 2020 – Mary’s in India

song-lyric-sunday

Jim Adams’ Song Lyric Sunday gives us the chance to share familiar, and sometimes not so familiar, songs.

If you fancy sharing one of your favourite songs you can find out how to participate, and also listen to all the great entries, here.

I’ve chosen another great song by Florian Cloud de Bounevialle Armstrong and, by now, regular visitors will know that this is the real name of Dido.

From the album Life for Rent, produced in September 2003, I’m offering you a fun song called Mary’s in India. Dido obviously enjoys singing this one and, in the last couple of lines, you can discern a distinct note of fun. Or maybe it is smugness!

The first video is a live performance at Brixton Academy which gives the background to the song.

and the second video is the original recording embellished with not only Spanish and English subtitles but with several still photographs.

Mary’s in India

Dido

Danny is lonely ’cause Mary’s in India now
She said she’d call but that was three weeks ago
She left all her things well, her books and her letters from him
And as the sun rises on Mary it sets on him

Just dance, just drink and just see the things
I’ll probably never get a chance to see

Danny’s not eating, he’s drinking and sleeping in
I saw him last night at a party, he’s definitely thin
He says he’s happy, he looked pretty good but I think
That as the sun rises on Mary, it sets on him

And just dance, and just drink and just see the things
I’ll probably never get a chance to see

Danny came over last night and I cooked for him
We talked about you Mary and how much we loved you still
He told me he’s packed up your books and your letters and things
And as the sun sets on Mary, it’s rising on him

And we danced and we drank and I’ve seen some things
You probably never got a chance to see
Don’t worry Mary, ’cause I’m taking care of Danny
And he’s taking care of me

Source: LyricFind

Songwriters: Dido Armstrong / Rollo Armstrong

Mary’s in India lyrics © Warner Chappell Music, Inc, BMG Rights Management

Song Lyric Sunday – March 15, 2020 – Against All Odds I’ve managed to find a song

song-lyric-sundayJim Adams’ Song Lyric Sunday gives us the chance to share familiar, and sometimes not so familiar, songs. This week, from his options of Give /Get /Take /Receive /Send I’ve chosen to link to the word TAKE.

If you fancy sharing one of your favourite songs you can find out how to participate, and also listen to all the great entries, here.

I imagine you’ve all heard of Phil Collins, the drummer, and backing vocals singer, for the rock band Genesis, who rather reluctantly took over as lead singer when Peter Gabriel left the band in August 1975.

The rest, as they say, is history. He had tremendous success as the lead singer, went on to have a very successful solo career, and also formed the Phil Collins Big Band. Despite his popular success he was often slated by the critics and even dubbed “The most hated man in rock” by the Daily Telegraph.

I guess he is, in British terms, a Marmite star. You either love him, or hate him. I happen to love him!

I am sharing with you the song Against All Odds (Take a Look at Me Now) This version is linked to the film Against all Odds directed by Taylor Hackford and starring Rachel Ward, Jeff Bridges, James Woods, Alex Karras and Jane Greer.

There is a second version below, performed at Live Aid in 1985. He had a rather hectic schedule that day, performing at both the London, and Philadelphia concerts!

Against All Odds (Take a Look at Me Now)

How can I just let you walk away
Just let you leave without a trace?
When I stand here taking every breath with you, ooh ooh
You’re the only one who really knew me at all

How can you just walk away from me
When all I can do is watch you leave?
‘Cause we’ve shared the laughter and the pain
And even shared the tears
You’re the only one who really knew me at all

So take a look at me now
Well there’s just an empty space
And there’s nothing left here to remind me
Just the memory of your face
Ooh, take a look at me now
Well there’s just an empty space
And you coming back to me is against the odds
And that’s what I’ve got to face

I wish I could just make you turn around
Turn around and see me cry
There’s so much I need to say to you
So many reasons why
You’re the only one who really knew me at all

So take a look at me now
Well there’s just an empty space
And there’s nothing left here to remind me
Just the memory of your face

Now Take a look at me now
‘Cause that’s just an empty space
But to wait for you is all I can do
And that’s what I’ve got to face

Take a good look at me now
‘Cause I’ll still be standing here
And you coming back to me is against all odds
It’s the chance I’ve got to take
Take a look at me now

Source: LyricFind

Songwriters: Phillip David Charles Collins

Against All Odds lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, Concord Music Publishing LLC

 

On 13th July 1985, Collins took part in the Live Aid concerts, a continuation of the fundraising effort started by Band Aid. Collins was the only performer to appear at the London concert at Wembley Stadium,  and the U.S. concert at JFK Stadium in Philadelphia on the same day. After he performed “Against All Odds” and “In the Air Tonight” and sang alongside Sting, Collins travelled to Philadelphia via Concorde to perform his solo material, play drums for Clapton, and drum with Plant and Jimmy Page for a Led Zeppelin reunion.

Broadcast across the world via one of the largest satellite link-ups of all time, the concerts were seen by around 40% of the global population.

In this video you will see a rare bum note in his playing, and he was accused of not rehearsing properly for the American end of his busy day. I think he can be excused for that!

I hope you enjoy!