Lundi limerick #76

OK, I have to admit defeat. There is, apparently, no village, town, or city in the UK that starts with an X!

There are plenty that start with EX, such as:

Exe – Somerset
Exe – Devon
Exeter – Devon
Exley – Calderdale
Exminster – Devon
Exmoor – Somerset
Exmouth – Devon
Exnaboe – Shetland Islands
Exning – Suffolk
Exted – Kent
Exton – Hampshire

Although the great google in the sky says that Exe exists in both Devon and Somerset I can only find the River Exe, which I was aware of.

It rises at Exe Head, near the village of Simonsbath, on Exmoor in Somerset, 5.2 miles from the Bristol Channel coast, but flows more or less directly due south, so that most of its length lies in Devon. It is 35 miles long.

The longest river in the UK is the River Severn which is 220 miles long and has the greatest flow in England and Wales. It has been the source of a great deal of flooding recently.

Not that any of this gives me a limerick, so here goes.

 

Sexy-Sadie from Exe in Devon

thought she’d died and ended in heaven

but sad to recall

she had suffered a fall

and was drowning quite fast in the Severn

 

Song Lyric Sunday – March 1 2020 – Listen /Hear /Talk /Speak

song-lyric-sundayHere we are again with Jim Adams’ Song Lyric Sunday where he gives us the chance to share familiar, and sometimes not so familiar, songs. This week he’s asked us to share ORAL or AURAL songs

If you fancy sharing one of your favourite songs you can find out how to participate, and also listen to all the great entries, here.

I’m rather busy this week so my entry will be a very basic affair.

I’m offering a song from one of my favourite groups, The Hollies. The song is called Listen to Me.

“LISTEN TO ME” was recorded in Abbey Road studios, and released in September 1968. The single was #5 in Holland, #10 New Zealand, #11 UK, #13 Germany, #33 Canada, and #129 US. This was the last Hollies single with founding member Graham Nash, who left to form Crosby, Stills & Nash with David Crosby and Stephen Stills.

The video is poor quality I’m afraid, but the words resonate with me greatly. They remind me of my first real love, at a time that I was losing her. I was aged 20. That’s it folks. You can imagine whatever you wish for the rest of the tale.

Listen to Me

The Hollies

Listen to me I’ll sing a song
To change your mind

Have you ever wondered why
When everything goes wrong
Nobody stops to lend a hand
Nobody seems to care
Then she looks you in the eye
And suddenly you’re strong
And very soon you realize
That you didn’t care about love

Listen to me I’ll sing a song
To change your mind
Your ears are deaf
Your mouth is dumb
Your eyes are blind
Listen to me and very soon
I think you’ll find
Somebody wants to help you
Somebody seems to care
And very soon you’ve forgotten
That you didn’t care about love

Does it hurt to realize
You’ve been acting very strange
Refusing to take the love she gives
Pretending you don’t care
Did it take you by surprise
To discover how you’d changed
How you forgot to remember
That you didn’t care about love

Listen to me I’ll sing a song
To change your mind
Your ears are deaf
Your mouth is dumb,
Your eyes are blind
Listen to me and very soon
I think you’ll find
Somebody wants to help you
Somebody seems to care
And very soon you’ve forgotten
That you didn’t care about love

Listen to me I’ll sing a song
To change your mind
Your ears are deaf
Your mouth is dumb,
Your eyes are blind
Listen to me and very soon
I think you’ll find
Somebody wants to help you
Somebody seems to care
And very soon you’ve forgotten
That you didn’t care about love
You didn’t care about love
You didn’t care about
You didn’t care about
You didn’t care about love

Source: LyricFind

Songwriters: Tony Hazzard

Listen to Me lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

Song Lyric Sunday – February 23, 2020 – Ankles/Hands/Feet/Fingers/Toes/Wrists

song-lyric-sundayHere we are again with Jim Adams’ Song Lyric Sunday where he gives us the chance to share familiar, and sometimes not so familiar, songs. This week he’s asked us to share parts of our bodies.

If you fancy sharing one of your favourite songs you can find out how to participate, and also listen to all the great entries, here.

Now, I’m not sure about you but I am a little bit hesitant to share bits of my body with just any Tom, Dick, or Harry so I’ll leave it to La Dispute to do that for me.

However, there is only one word to describe my offering this week and that is obscure. The band is obscure. The song is obscure, and  although the title is Such Small Hands the song is not about, nor does it contain the word, Hands. For some strange reason I like it. I hope you do too!

For the Pierre de Marivaux work from which the band’s name is derived, see La Dispute.

The title refers to an E. E. Cummings poem titled “Somewhere I Have Never Traveled, Gladly Beyond”, similarly to the album’s last track “Nobody, Not Even The Rain”.

The poem features the line:

“Nobody, not even the rain, has such small hands.” (Well, maybe Donald Trump!)

The poem is recited on La Dispute’s Here, Hear. EP, on the track entitled “Two”.

The following are comments left on the YouTube entry:

I don’t understand why I like this so much

This song always gives me goosebumps

A bonus track called “Nine” (Violitionist Sessions) can be seen by clicking here.

A comment on this one says:

Filmed at my grandma Elsa`s house. Thats what talent looks like. Support this band!!!!

Such Small Hands

La Dispute

I think I saw you in my sleep, darling
I think I saw you in my dreams you were
Stitching up the seams on every broken promise
That your body couldn’t keep.
I think I saw you in my sleep.
Oh, I think I saw you in my sleep darling

I think I saw you in my dreams
You were stitching up the seams on every broken promise
That your body couldn’t keep

I think I saw you in my sleep
I thought I heard the door open, oh no

I thought I heard the door open but
I only heard it close.
I thought I heard a plane crashing, but
Now I think it was your passion snapping.
I think you saw me confronting my fear, it

Went up with a bottle and went down with the beer and
I think you ought to stay away from here
There are ghosts in the walls and they
Crawl in your head through your ear.
I think I saw you in my sleep, lover
I think I saw you in my dreams you were
Stitching up the seams on every mangled promise
That your body couldn’t keep
I think I saw you in my sleep

 

Source: Musixmatch

Songwriters: Bradley Ryen Vander Lugt / Kevin Scott Whittemore / Adam David Vass / Jordan Lee Dreyer / Chad William Sterenberg

Such Small Hands lyrics © Vagrant Records Publishing

Song Lyric Sunday – 16/02/2020 – Come /Go /Leave /Stay

song-lyric-sundayJim Adams hosts Song Lyric Sunday and gives us the chance to share lots of familiar, and some not so familiar, songs. 

If you fancy sharing one of your favourite songs you can find out how to participate, and also listen to all the great entries, by clicking HERE. You’re bound to find something you like and, very likely, something that you have never heard before. Sit back and enjoy the music.

Today, I’m offering you a song by Florian Cloud de Bounevialle Armstrong. That’s a good start isn’t it?

Well, let’s make it a bit easier. Her Mum and Dad called her Dido.

The song I’ve chosen is Don’t Leave Home.  Dido co-wrote the song with her brother Rollo of the Electronic music group Faithless. It was originally a demo recorded for her 1999 album No Angel that was instead included on the 2003 album, Life for Rent.

On first hearing, this appears to be a nice love song but really it deals with drug addiction. It is written and sung from the unusual point of view of the drug singing to the person who is addicted to it.

It only reached #25 in the UK singles charts but reached the top of the Airplay charts. Even so, I think it is a really beautiful song, if a little sad when you know the story behind it.

I hope you enjoy it!

However, if you are feeling depressed after listening it, there is a bonus track at the bottom which is bound to cheer you up.

Don’t Leave Home

Dido

Like a ghost don’t need a key
Your best friend I’ve come to be
Please don’t think of getting up for me
You don’t even need to speak

When I’ve been here for just one day
You’ll already miss me if I go away
So close the blinds and shut the door
You won’t need other friends anymore
Oh don’t leave home, oh don’t leave home

And if you’re cold, I’ll keep you warm
If you’re low, just hold on
‘Cause I will be your safety
Oh, don’t leave home

And I arrived when you were weak
I’ll make you weaker, like a child
Now all your love you give to me
When your heart is all I need
Oh don’t leave home, oh don’t leave home

And if you’re cold, I’ll keep you warm
And if you’re low, just hold on
‘Cause I will be your safety
Oh, don’t leave home

Oh how quiet, quiet the world can be
When it’s just you and little me
Everything is clear, and everything is new
So you won’t be leaving, will you?

And if you’re cold, I’ll keep you warm
And if you’re low, just hold on
‘Cause I will be your safety
Oh, don’t leave home
‘Cause I will be your safety
And I will be your safety
I will be your safety
Oh, don’t leave home

Source: LyricFind

Songwriters: Dido Armstrong / Rollo Armstrong

Don’t Leave Home lyrics © Warner Chappell Music, Inc, BMG Rights Management

BONUS TRACK    Dexy’s Midnight Runners    Come on Eileen

 

Song Lyric Sunday 09/02/2020 – I/Me/Them/Us/You/We

song-lyric-sundayThanks again to Jim Adams, who hosts Song Lyric Sunday and gives us the chance to share lots of familiar, and some not so familiar, songs. This week he’s given us the task to find a song that has the personal pronouns: I /Me /Them /Us /You / or We in the title, or in the lyrics.

If you fancy sharing one of your favourite songs you can find out how to participate, and also listen to all the great entries, here.

This week I’ve chosen a song containing the word “I”, but the lyrics also include “Me”.

The song is “Yesterday when I was young”, written by Charles Aznavour with Georges Garvarentz back in 1964.  Herbert Kretzmer, who also translated Aznavour’s hit “She,” wrote the English-language lyrics.

I’ve included a link, at the bottom,  to the writer’s recording, written and sung as only a Frenchman could,  but I am offering, as my main video, a recording made by Matt Munro in  1973.

Monro was a heavy smoker and battled alcoholism from the 1960s until 1981.  He died from liver cancer on 7 February 1985 at the age of only 54 which makes this recording particularly poignant.

 

And HERE is Charles Aznavour’s version

 

Yesterday When I Was Young

It seems the love I’ve known
Has always been the most destructive kind
I guess that’s why now
I feel so old
Before my time

Yesterday, when I was young
The taste of life was sweet as rain upon my tongue
I teased at life as if it were a foolish game
The way the evening breeze may tease a candle flame
The thousand dreams I dreamed, the splendid things I planned
I always built to last on weak and shifting sand
I lived by night and shunned the naked light of the day
And only now I see how the years ran away

Yesterday, when I was young
So many happy songs were waiting to be sung
So many wild pleasures lay in store for me
And so much pain my dazzled eyes refused to see
I ran so fast that time and youth at last ran out
I never stopped to think what life was all about
And every conversation I can now recall
Concerned itself with me and nothing else at all

Yesterday the moon was blue
And every crazy day brought something new to do
I used my magic age as if it were a wand
And never saw the waste and emptiness beyond
The game of love I played with arrogance and pride
And every flame I lit too quickly, quickly died
The friends I made all seemed somehow to drift away
And only I am left on stage to end the play

There are so many songs in me that won’t be sung
I feel the bitter taste of tears upon my tongue
The time has come for me to pay for
Yesterday, when I was young

Source: LyricFind

Yesterday When I Was Young lyrics © Universal Music Publishing Group

A view from across the pond, and back

“The President is merely the most important among a large number of public servants. He should be supported or opposed exactly to the degree which is warranted by his good conduct or bad conduct, his efficiency or inefficiency in rendering loyal, able, and disinterested service to the Nation as a whole. Therefore it is absolutely necessary that there should be full liberty to tell the truth about his acts, and this means that it is exactly necessary to blame him when he does wrong as to praise him when he does right. Any other attitude in an American citizen is both base and servile. To announce that there must be no criticism of the President, or that we are to stand by the President, right or wrong, is not only unpatriotic and servile, but is morally treasonable to the American public. Nothing but the truth should be spoken about him or any one else. But it is even more important to tell the truth, pleasant or unpleasant, about him than about any one else.” – Theodore Roosevelt, 26th US President (1858-1919)