Twittering Tales #61 – 5 December 2017

It’s time again for Kat Myrman’s wonderful challenge to tax our creative souls. Just take her photo prompt and write a story, inspired by it, in 280 characters or fewer.

img_0066.jpgPhoto by MorningbirdPhoto at Pixabay.com

Here is this week’s prompt and my contribution. Check out all the fabulous entries here.

Charlotte and Dai were in the Maze. Quite why they were in the middle, and so far North, she had no idea.

She was one of 5 daughters from the Lower East side of New York, from an ‘all of a kind family.’

“Be careful,” she called to Dai, “there may be a monster in the hollows!”

(277 characters)

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Twittering Tales #60​ – 28 November 2017

It’s time again for Kat Myrman’s wonderful challenge to tax our creative souls. Just take her photo prompt and write a story, inspired by it, in 280 characters or fewer.

central-park-1684286_1280.jpgA Creative Commons Photo from Pixabay.com

Here is this week’s prompt and my contribution. Check out all the fabulous entries here.

Hector decided he could no longer tolerate the smell. He just had to confront the culprit and put an end to it.
“I won’t tell you again”, he said. “If you can’t control all that gas, you and I must go our separate ways!”
“I promise you, I’ll see the doc tomorrow”, the driver said.

(280 characters)

My Brain

This was written at the age of about 17, in my “sort of journal”. It probably explains a lot about me, and definitely shows up the early onset of idiocy!

In case some readers do not know what tripe is, you probably don’t want to know, but this is what it looks like:

tripeSeriously, would you eat this?

The harder I try to put my feelings and thoughts into words, the more difficult it becomes.

To write down these words, on paper, is even more difficult, nye impossible. The seeming infinity of the brain’s reasoning functions, and its associated thought patterns, far surpass the ability of man to put these resources to use.

Ever since time began, man’s brain has puzzled even the most brilliant specialists. Looking like a lump of tripe, its intricacy, yet simplicity is still not fully understood and, I think, will remain so until long after I’m dead.

With the brilliant circuits, made up of still more brilliant microscopic electronic components, man has strived to produce an artificial “brain”. However, the powers that made us, obviously did not intend us to know the “elixir of life”, for that’s surely what the brain must be.

Man can artificially produce all components of the body except the brain, and, perhaps, someday he may be granted the knowledge of knowledge. God help us when he is. Just think of the corruption it would bring.

I do not see, however, how such a wonderful collection of matter can possibly understand itself. The mere fact that it is so marvellous makes it unbelievable and, therefore, I think, almost impossible to fathom. I say almost because, in this age, specialists have successfully probed and repaired and, in one case transplanted brain matter.

I could go on for pages and pages but my lump of tripe tells me to stop, and who am I to argue with such wisdom?

Twittering Tales #58 – 14 November 2017

It’s time again for Kat Myrman’s wonderful challenge to tax our creative souls. Just take her photo prompt and write a story, inspired by it, in 280 characters or fewer.

light.jpg

Here is this week’s prompt and my contribution. Check out all the fabulous entries here.

Now that the nights were drawing in, Peter was unsure whether there would be enough light to see to complete a full 280 characters.

280, for goodness sake. He’d had trouble trying to write 140 each week. Never mind , he thought, I’ll just get the lamp lit to complete…….…….damn!

(280 characters)

Twittering Tale #57 – 7 November 2017

It’s time again for Kat Myrman’s wonderful challenge to tax our creative souls. Just take her photo prompt and write a story, inspired by it, in 140 characters or fewer.

saddle-2613958_1280

Here is this week’s prompt and my contribution. Check out all the fabulous entries here.

The emu skull looked great mounted on the shiny springs. The bone was acquiring a fine patina, but it was still a most uncomfortable ride!

(139 characters)

The People Are The Difference

A lovely article, written by a lovely man, and shared by another lovely man, and I know neither of them, nor have I met them. It’s often the little things that make the biggest impact.

Mitigating Chaos

There was “something about Aiken” that I first noticed during my visits in early 1999.  We were considering buying the funeral homes and cemetery there and surely didn’t want to make a bad decision.   I didn’t feel the stress we sometimes felt in Columbia, where we had lived for three years. Aiken was different.  This guy and his wife, both from New Jersey, took the leap, purchased the businesses and moved to a beautiful, small Southern city.  th-3

Funeral service, like many businesses,  depends on the building of trusting relationships and following through on promises made.  I was fortunate to get acquainted with many community leaders and their help, guidance and example were invaluable. For me, it was the people that made Aiken different.

One of those people/leaders was Jeff Wallace. Jeff was the editor of The Aiken Standard for most of the years we owned our businesses.  We…

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Twittering Tale #56 – 31 October 2017

It’s time again for Kat Myrman’s wonderful challenge to tax our creative souls. Just take her photo prompt and write a story, inspired by it, in 140 characters or fewer.

This week we have three pictures to work with, and my contribution uses all three. Check out all the fabulous entries here.

Pumpkin Mom looked out over her brood, fondly remembering the romps in the hay bales!
Granny, wrapping her stole around, smiled knowingly.

(137 characters)

the way of loneliness

Another “beleaguered” masterpiece which may resonate with some. I like to be alone, but never feel lonely when I am. I suppose I am extremely lucky in that. I know that loneliness can be really difficult for some, who feel alone even when surrounded by the hubbub of life!

No Talent For Certainty

he chose the way of loneliness,
to feel wide open spaces,

to hide his many-sorrowed heart,
and guess, from people’s faces

the things that they might hide, as well;
by shore, on hill, in gym —

he chose the way of loneliness,
or maybe,
it chose him

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Twittering Tale #55 – 24 October 2017

It’s time again for Kat Myrman’s wonderful challenge to tax our creative souls. Just take her photo prompt and write a story, inspired by it, in 140 characters or fewer.

tunnel-2879921_1280

Here is this week’s prompt and my contribution. Check out all the fabulous entries here.

Fancy going hunting with Mum and me?

Yea!

Come on then. I know a short cut to the woods.

So, off they set, the three of them together, forever!

(140 characters)

This is part 3, and the happy ending. Part 1 can be found here, and part 2 here.

Travelling down the Rhine on a duck

In the Summer of 1962, at the age of 14, I travelled to Germany, with the Combined Cadet Force from my school, for a Summer Camp.

It was quite an adventure to get there. We travelled by military steam train, with the carriages being loaded onto the ferry for the channel crossing. It must have been very nearly the last such journey.

We eventually arrived at 2 Division Signal Regiment, in Bünde, West Germany, a Regiment I was later to be posted to as a regular soldier.

2 div.png

The Crossed Keys of 2 Division

 

 

There were still National Servicemen who had been conscripted into the forces for 2 years. These were the last of a dying breed as the last National Servicemen left the armed forces in May 1963.

I well remember that the soldiers took great delight in plying us with beer, probably at our own expense. That Summer, far from home, was the first time that I became extremely drunk, and extremely unwell.

We obviously overdid the cigarettes too. When I returned home I suffered, for a few days, with what was diagnosed as nicotine poisoning!

During our 10 days there we went out on exercise with the Regiment and did all sorts of, what was to us young boys, very exciting things. We helped camouflage vehicles, laid large capacity cables, helped put up radio masts, slept in abandoned barns and spent a day with the German Army.

It was during this “exchange day” that I encountered the DUKW (duck) that was to transport us down the river. (For the technically minded, more information here)

Ten very excited teenagers squeezed into the restricted space at the back and were driven down a ramp, into the water, where we progressed at a very sedate pace for 20 minutes or so, driving back up another ramp to dry land.

dukw

To be honest it was a bit disappointing, certainly not as exciting as the next half hour when we were transported at some considerable speed back up river, sirens wailing, in a fast patrol craft.

We then experienced a German Army lunch, for many, the first ever taste of “foreign” food. Tepid cabbage soup, cold würst, sauerkraut, black bread, and a strange pudding of yogurt. A new experience that was not repeated until it became more commonplace in the UK.

Postscript

In fact the river in question may not have been the Rhine. Memory being what it is, it could have been the Mösel, or even the Wëser. I have travelled on all of these, but, at the time, it seemed to be a very wide, and busy, river.

Part of the series Some things I’ve done that you probably haven’t!