Song Lyric Sunday Theme for 21/04/2019 – Seasons

img_1345-3Thank you to Jim Adams, who tirelessly hosts Song Lyric Sunday and gives us the chance to share lots of favourite, and some not so familiar, songs.

The theme for this week is Seasons/Winter/Spring/Summer/Fall

If you fancy sharing one of your favourite songs you can find out how to participate, and also listen to all the great entries, here.

I don’t think that many will have heard of the singer on my chosen song this week, and you’ll have to be alert to catch him because there are only 19 words in all!

The artist is a man who had a tragic accident in June 1973 that left him using a wheelchair, paralysed from the waist down, after an inebriated fall from a 4th floor window. He claims, ironically, that this accident probably saved his life, because he was, at the time, an alcoholic, often matching Keith Moon drink for drink.

Like Keith Moon, Robert Wyatt was a drummer. He was a founding member of the influential Canterbury scene bands Soft Machine and Matching Mole. After his accident he continued to play drums, adopting  more of a jazz style, obviously not using his feet. Although, on reflection, he always did favour jazz.

This track is taken from the album Shleep, produced in 1997. I think you may find it different from your normal listening, but I hope you enjoy it!

 

Out of Season

This song is by Robert Wyatt and appears on the album Shleep (1997).

A late sparrow fledging
Bathing in dust
Beneath the gaping mouth
Of the post box
(Hungry for letters home)

BONUS

A bonus this week, is an instrumental, from Rick Wakeman, called Seasons of Change.

https://youtu.be/9x54uMcZnTs

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Twittering Tales #132 – 16 April 2019

It’s time again, for Kat Myrman’s wonderful challenge, to write a story, inspired by her picture prompt, in 280 characters or fewer.

Here is this week’s prompt and my contribution.

Check out all the fabulously creative entries here and, if you’ve never had a go, why not try a story of your own? You may surprise yourself!

img_4398Photo by Luis Quintero on Unsplash.com

The emergency survival packs had been set up for years, they were all over the city.

They held weapons, ammunition, water, food, and a radio.

Each agent had a unique access code to punch in on the keyboard, and a voice code to verify.

What the hell was the cat’s name I’d chosen?

(279 characters)

Song Lyric Sunday Theme for 14/04/2019 – Glitter Freeze

img_1345-3Thank you to Jim Adams, who hosts Song Lyric Sunday, and gives us the chance to share lots of favourite, and some not so familiar, songs.

The theme for this week is Freeze/Cold/Ice

If you fancy sharing one of your favourite songs you can find out how to participate, and also listen to all the great entries, here.

I’ve previously shared songs on SLS where I couldn’t find the lyrics. Never before have I offered a song by a group that doesn’t exist!

Well, there’s a first time for everything because Gorillaz are a British virtual band created in 1998 by musician Damon Albarn and artist Jamie Hewlett. The band primarily consists of four animated members: 2-D(lead vocals, keyboards, melodica), Murdoc Niccals (bass guitar), Noodle (guitars, occasionally keyboards and vocals), and Russel Hobbs (drums and percussion). Their fictional universe is explored through music videos, interviews, and other short cartoons. In reality, Albarn is the only permanent musical contributor, and often collaborates with other musicians.

In March 2001, Gorillaz played their first show at the Scala in London before embarking on a UK tour later that summer, with one date in Paris and two in Japan. During this tour the live band played behind a giant projector screen which covered the whole stage, on which was projected various visuals and images created by Hewlett. After taking a short break over the holidays, the tour resumed with a North American leg in February 2002

The song I’ve chosen, released in 2010, features Mark E. Smith of the Fall, and includes some Morse code at the beginning. After Mark asks “Where’s North from ‘ere”, the code answers “ Plastic Beach” which is the name of the album.

Apparently, Mark wanted to do his part facing north and asked ‘Where’s North from ‘ere?’ They left the words in!

Like ‘Punk’ on the first album, and ‘White Light’ on ‘Demon Days’, this is the album’s rawkus section of chaos. Every album’s got to have one.“ – band member Murdoc Niccals in an interview with NME

The song is Glitter Freeze – I hope you enjoy it.

There are very few lyrics, and, unless you want to analyse them in detail, they probably are purely incidental.

[Intro : Mark E. Smith]
Where’s North from here?

[Morse code for Plastic Beach]

[Interlude : Mark E. Smith]
It was
The glitter freeze
Doctor F
Listen
You wouldn’t credit
Or believe this

Aha ha ha
Ship him far!

Here are a couple of alternative recordings:

Live at Glastonbury 2010

An alternative version

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Song Lyric Sunday Theme for 07/04/2019 – Burn/Fire/Flame

img_1345-3

Thank you to Jim Adams, who hosts Song Lyric Sunday, and gives us the chance to share lots of favourite, and some not so familiar, songs.

The theme for this week is Burn/Fire/Flame.

If you fancy sharing one of your favourite songs you can find out how to participate, and also listen to all the great entries, here.

One of the first things I like to check, when choosing what music to share with you lovely people, is what music I have on my MacBook that will fit the theme.

Sure enough, I came up with a couple of choices and decided to go for something completely different, a Gregorian Chant from an album that I’m sure everyone has at home!!!! The album is “Gregorian Chants – Greatest Hits”. Yes, it really does exist.

I chose to offer you “The Mystic Flame” by Simon Cooper, which is a modern version of a Gregorian Chant, first released in 1998 on his album “Hymns of the Ancient Fire.’

That was the easy bit. The next bit I failed completely. I have no idea what the lyrics are and, really, I don’t think it matters, it just goes to show that good music is good music whether there are words or not, although it does rather fail as far as SLS goes.

However, it is as it is. I hope you enjoy the music. I find it relaxing and very pleasant. Simon Cooper is quite prolific in his writing and even writes music for babies in the womb. The chant doesn’t start until about the 2.40 mark!

Just in case you cannot access this I’m adding another version below.

https://youtu.be/3KgQsGpDz0k

Because Fire and Flame Burns brightly, and to make your day even brighter, I’m adding the song Bright, by Echosmith which I came across on J-Dubs Grin and Bear it site on her entry for atozchallenge. Thanks to JilyWily. I love this!

 

 

 

 

Twittering Tales #130 – 2 April 2019

It’s time again, for Kat Myrman’s wonderful challenge, to write a story, inspired by her picture prompt, in 280 characters or fewer.

Here is this week’s prompt and my contribution.

Check out all the fabulously creative entries here and, if you’ve never had a go, why not try a story of your own? You may surprise yourself!

img_4326Photo by Marc Schäfer at Unsplash.com

A sad room, full of empty bottles, was the only thing left by the father I’d not seen for the past 25 years.

The police had contacted me after finding an old newspaper cutting that identified me.

After settling his debts, I left the room, the memories, and the empty words, behind.

(279 characters)

Song Lyric Sunday Theme for 31/03/2019 – Record/Juke Box/DJ/Radio

Thank you to Jim Adams, who hosts Song Lyric Sunday, and gives us the chance to share lots of favourite, and some not so familiar, songs.

The theme for this week is Record/Juke Box/DJ/Radio. Not all of them, you understand, but pick any one, or combine any number!

If you fancy sharing one of your favourite songs you can find out how to participate, and also listen to all the great entries, here.

It’s amazing how many song lyrics don’t actually make much sense. I dare say some are drug, or alcohol induced, or influenced. Often the writer, and certainly the critics, will wax lyrical about how there is a deep, or hidden , meaning to the words. Lots of baloney will be spoken about transcendental higher planes, or searching for a new, yet unattainable awakening!

Do we really care whether Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds is about LSD?

I think not, so long as the music is enjoyable, and the words are lyrical, we are content to sit back and enjoy it.

The music I’m offering to you today certainly has lyrics that, for the most part, make no sense. What’s more, the writers admit that they make no sense. Read about the song, and what R.E.M said about “Radio Free Europe.” in the Songfacts information below.

Radio Free Europe is a radio network run by the United States government that broadcasts to Europe and the Middle East. The mission of the broadcasts is to promote democracy and freedom, but R.E.M. makes the point that this can easily cross the line into propaganda.

This song was R.E.M.’s first single, released in 1981 before they signed to a major label. A better-produced version was included on Murmur, the band’s first full-length album, in 1983.

There was a good reason for Michael Stipe’s infamously indecipherable lyrics on this song: he hadn’t finished them by the time they recorded it. In a 1988 NME interview, Stipe described the lyrical content as “complete babbling.”

R.E.M. lead singer Michael Stipe said in a 1983 interview with Alternative America: “We were all so scared of what the other one would say, that everyone nodded their head in agreement to anything to come up. The earlier songs were incredibly fundamental, real simple, songs that you could write in five minutes. Most of them didn’t have any words. I just got up and howled and hollered a lot.

That’s true. I’ve got to write words for ‘Radio Free Europe,’ because we’re going to re-record that for the album. It still doesn’t have a second or third verse. I think there are actually lyrics to every song on the EP.”

“This song was pivotal to the continuation of our career,” drummer Bill Berry explained in Part Lies, Part Heart, Part Truth, Part Garbage 1982-2011. “Most fans may not realize that for two years before Murmur was released, we barely made financial ends meet by playing tiny clubs around the southeast. Our gasoline budget prevented us from venturing further. Put simply, our existence was impoverished. College radio and major city club scenes embraced this song and expanded our audience to the extent that we moved from small clubs to medium-sized venues and the additional revenue made it possible to logically pursue this wild musical endeavor. I dare not contemplate what our fate would have been had this song not appeared when it did.”

Stipe noted being apparently unaware of his own genius: “The guys always said I do something harmonically here that made them all go ‘whoa,’ because it was so advanced … or something, in the ‘straight off the boat’ part. I wonder if I tricked them by accident? I still have no idea what it is they’re talking about.”

The video for this song, directed by Arthur Pierson, was shot in the famed Paradise Gardens, a folk art sculpture garden crafted by artist Howard Finster in Pennville, Georgia. Finster, a Baptist minister, also painted the album art for R.E.M.’s second album, Reckoning.

Information c/o songfacts.com

Radio Free Europe

Beside yourself if radio’s gonna stay.
Reason: it could polish up the gray.
Put that put that put that up your wall
That this isn’t country at all

Raving station beside yourself

Keep me out of country in the word
Deal the porch is leading us absurd.
Push that push that push that to the hull
That this isn’t nothing at all.

Straight off the boat where to go?
Calling on in transit calling on in transit
Radio Free Europe, radio

Beside defying media too fast
Instead of pushing palaces to fall
Put that, put that, put that before all
That this isn’t fortunate at all

Raving station, beside yourself
Calling on in transit, calling on in transit
Radio Free Europe, radio

Decide yourself, calling all of the medias too fast

Keep me out of country in the word
Disappoint is into us absurd

Straight off the boat, where to go?
Calling on in transit, calling on in transit
Radio Free Europe
Radio Free Europe

Calling on in transit, calling on in transit
Radio Free Europe, Radio Free Europe

Writer/s: BILL BERRY, PETER BUCK, MICHAEL MILLS, MICHAEL STIPE 
Publisher: Warner/Chappell Music, Inc., Universal Music Publishing Group
Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

Here are a couple of other recordings of the song:

From Showtime’s Rock of the 80’s – Recorded live at the Palace – Los Angeles, CA – 1984

https://youtu.be/Gt58m0h9d_M

and a compilation video

https://youtu.be/Ac0oaXhz1u8

Twittering Tales #129 – 26 March 2019

It’s time again, for Kat Myrman’s wonderful challenge, to write a story, inspired by her picture prompt, in 280 characters or fewer.

Here is this week’s prompt and my contribution.

Check out all the fabulously creative entries here and, if you’ve never had a go, why not try a story of your own? You may surprise yourself!

img_0017.jpgPhoto by Tony Dinh at Unsplash.com

It was a huge turnout for the inaugural “Invisible Hot Air Balloon Convention.”
The baskets had to be in the form of bird cages, but otherwise there were no restrictions. Balloons could be any shape and size, and colour.
Everyone was ecstatic.
Me, I just couldn’t see the attraction!

(279 characters)

Song Lyric Sunday Theme for 24/03/2019

img_1345-3Thank you to Jim Adams, who hosts Song Lyric Sunday, and gives us the chance to share lots of favourite, and some not so familiar, songs.

The theme for this week is Minutes/Hours/Days/ Weeks/Months. I think Jim left out the Seconds on purpose, just to make things more difficult!

I don’t know about everyone who participates in this great weekly music fest but, for me, it means I lose at least an hour when trying to choose what song I’m offering. I get rather carried away (some may say that I ought to be!) and spend ages listening to my own music, discovering other songs via linked videos, and looking up all sorts of facts about songs, groups, deaths, and so on. It is very addictive, but I have only myself to blame and, anyway, I thoroughly enjoy it!

If you fancy sharing one of your favourite songs you can find out how to participate, and also listen to all the great entries, here.

This week I’m sharing a song, from the Ray Davies album, See My Friends. Anyone who knows Ray Davies will know that he formed The Kinks, in 1964, with his brother  Dave. The group remained active for 32 years, then reformed in 2018 to produce a studio album.  See My Friends was a single for the Kinks, released in 1965, and was probably the first pop song influenced by traditional music from the Indian Subcontinent.

The See My Friends album is a terrific mix of collaborations between Ray Davies and various artists ranging from Metallica to Paloma Faith. It was released in 2010. A list of tracks appears at the bottom of this post. Some of them, I’m sure, will be of interest. They really are a great mix of talents.

For your delight today I’ve chosen “Days/This Time Tomorrow” featuring Ray Davies (of course) and Mumford & Sons. I do hope you enjoy it.

Days / This Time Tomorrow

Ray Davies

Well, thank you for the days
Those endless days, those sacred days you gave me
I’m thinking of the days
I won’t forget a single day, believe me
I bless the light
I bless the light that shines on you, believe me
And though you’re gone
You’re with me every single day, believe me
Days I’ll remember all my life
Days when you can’t see wrong from right
You took my life but then I knew that
Very soon you’d leave me, but it’s all right
Now I’m not frightened of this world, believe me
This time tomorrow, where will we be?
On a spaceship somewhere sailing across an empty sea
This time tomorrow, what will we know?
Will we still be here watching an in-flight movie show?
Leave the sun behind me and I’ll watch the clouds
As they sadly pass me by, seven miles below me
I can see the world and it ain’t so big at all
This time tomorrow, what will we see?
Field full of houses, endless rows of crowded streets
I’ll leave the sun behind me and I’ll watch the clouds
As they sadly pass me by, I’m in perpetual motion
And the world below doesn’t matter much to me
Thank you for the days
(I’ll remember all my life)
Those endless days
(When you can’t see wrong from right)
Thank you for the days
(I’ll remember all my life)
Those endless days
(When you can’t see wrong from right)
Thank you for the days
(This time tomorrow)
Those endless days
(Where will you be?)
Thank you for the days
(On a spaceship somewhere)
Those endless days
(Sailing across an empty sea)
This time tomorrow, where will we be?
On a spaceship somewhere sailing across an empty sea

Songwriters: Ray Davies

Days / This Time Tomorrow lyrics © S.I.A.E. Direzione Generale, Davray Music Ltd.

  1. Better Things” – Ray Davies and Bruce Springsteen
  2. Celluloid Heroes” – Ray Davies, Jon Bon Jovi and Richie Sambora
  3. Days/This Time Tomorrow” – Ray Davies and Mumford & Sons
  4. “A Long Way from Home” – Ray Davies, Lucinda Williams and The 88
  5. You Really Got Me” – Ray Davies and Metallica
  6. Lola” – Ray Davies and Paloma Faith
  7. Waterloo Sunset” – Ray Davies and Jackson Browne
  8. Till the End of the Day” – Ray Davies, Alex Chilton and The 88
  9. Dead End Street” – Ray Davies and Amy Macdonald
  10. See My Friends” – Ray Davies and Spoon
  11. “This Is Where I Belong” – Ray Davies and Black Francis
  12. David Watts” – Ray Davies and The 88
  13. Tired of Waiting for You” – Ray Davies and Gary Lightbody
  14. All Day and All of the Night/Destroyer” – Ray Davies and Billy Corgan

Twittering Tale #128 – 19 March 2019

It’s time again, for Kat Myrman’s wonderful challenge, to write a story, inspired by her picture prompt, in 280 characters or fewer.

Here is this week’s prompt and my contribution.

Check out all the fabulously creative entries here and, if you’ve never had a go, why not try a story of your own? You may surprise yourself!

img_4222Photo by Matthew Henry at Unsplash.com

You think this is funny?

Cute?

Sweet?

Ah, I want one just like that?

Well, let me tell you matey, this ain’t any of the above.

It is agony!

I have an itch on my nose that I cannot scratch, AND I’m bursting for a pee.

The minute I get out of here I’m going to pee in every shoe I can find!

(280 characters)

Song Lyric Sunday Theme for 17/03/2019

img_1345-3My thanks, as always,  to Jim Adams, who hosts Song Lyric Sunday, and gives us the chance to share lots of favourite, and some not so familiar, songs. I see he’s added to his already heavy task this week by thanking,  by name,  each individual who contributed last week!

The theme for this week is School/Books/Learning. If you fancy sharing some of your favourite songs you can find out how to participate, and also listen to all the great entries here.

Immediately, this week, I thought of “Another Brick In The Wall”, “Schools Out”, and many other well known school related songs.

Well, I’m not going to give you any of those. Instead, I’m going way back to 9 December 1957.

I was around then, but had little or no interest in pop music, charts, hits, girls, and definitely no interest in sex and drugs and rock and roll. It was an altogether more innocent time when Ricky Nelson sang “Waitin’ in School”. Some may recognise it from having heard it in the film “Pulp Fiction”.

Waitin’ in School

Ricky Nelson

I been a-waitin’ in school all day long
A-waitin’ on the bell to ring so I can go home
Throw my books on the table, pick up the telephone
“Hello, baby, let’s get somethin’ goin'”

Headin’ down to the drugstore to get a soda pop
Throw a nickel in the jukebox, then we start to rock
My school gal baby, gonna tell ya some news
You sure look good in them baby-doll shoes

Well, it’s a-one, two, a-pull off my shoes
Three, four, get out on the floor
Five, six, come get your kicks
Down on the corner of Lincoln and a-forty-six
I’ve been a-waitin’ in school all day long
A-waitin’ on the bell to ring so I could go home
Throw my books on the table, pick up the telephone
“Hello, baby, let’s get somethin’ goin'”

Headin’ down to the drugstore to get a soda pop
Throw a nickel in the jukebox, then we start to rock
My school gal baby, gonna tell ya some news
You sure look good in them baby-doll shoes

Well, it’s a-one, two, a-pull off my shoes
Three, four, get out on the floor
Five, six, come get your kicks
Down on the corner of Lincoln and a-forty-six

Well, it’s a-one, two, a-pull off my shoes
Three, four, get out on the floor
Five, six, come get your kicks
Down on the corner of Lincoln and a-forty-six

You gotta move, start rockin’ baby
A rockin’, rockin’ baby
Gonna rock all night, rock all night
Just wait ‘n’ see

Writer(s): J., D. BURNETTE Lyrics powered by http://www.musixmatch.com

Ricky Nelson was, at one time, considered a very strong contender to eclipse Elvis Presley. Sadly, like so many stars, he died young. You can hear more about him by following the link below.

Whatever happened to Ricky Nelson?