A first for me – The first of March 2021.

Is the patient breathing?

How very strange it is to dial 999 for the very first time ever, to be greeted with “Emergency, which service do you require?” and to be asked that question, followed by “Is the patient conscious?” when the patient is actually the one making the call and that patient is ME!


I then went through an obviously very well scripted and professional series of questions to ascertain, in the fastest possible time, just what the problem was,  what was required in the way of immediate assistance, and in the longer term.

I had to give my history of Hypertension since 2002, Angina since 2005, Angiograms in 2005 and 2012 and, meanwhile, I was reassured that an ambulance was on its way.


When I last spoke to my doctor she asked “How often do you have to use your GTN spray?” (an under the tongue spray, that I have carried since 2005, to alleviate angina pain by opening up the arteries)   I replied “Oh, I haven’t used it for years.  I carry it around all the time and replace it when the lid starts to fall off!”.

Silly me!  Not that I’m superstitious, but you do have to wonder.

I already had a telephone appointment booked with the doctor in a couple of weeks’ time, a follow up from my tummy troubles that haven’t really cleared since before Christmas.  For a few days I “presented with a general feeling of unwell.” and just felt distinctly yuk.  I also had to use my spray several times!  On Saturday I felt really off and even, secretly, considered whether I needed to go to hospital.  Being a (stubborn old) man I didn’t!   On Sunday I suggested to my wife that I may have to phone the doctor on Monday to get an emergency appointment sooner.

Monday morning I spoke to the doctor and was told to phone 999 immediately, which I did!



Ambulance arrived, blue lights flashing, and I had 2 ECG’s, blood pressure taken several times, history and medication recorded.  All very efficient and reassuring. The ECG’s showed abnormalities, namely First degree heart block, (which I knew I had – and it sounds far worse than it actually is) and ectopic atrial rhythm.  I was allowed to walk out to the ambulance – a very reassuring sign – and was then whisked off to QMC (Queens Medical Centre) Nottingham, to A & E. I was assessed in reception, then moved to the Urgent Treatment Unit where I was given Paracetamol, pink tummy medicine, and liquid morphine.  

A very slick operation followed where I had 3 ECG’s, had my temperature and blood pressure taken about 10 times, had 2 lots of blood taken, a chest X-Ray, a scan of my tummy and bladder, saw 2 surgeons and 3 doctors, countless nurses and assistants, had a bite to eat and a cup of tea, and was eventually allowed to go home with new medication,  2 outpatient appointments booked,  and a collection of labels, gauze, sticky tape, and 10 sticky pads for ECG’s still attached to me. Souvenirs of an unexpected day out that didn’t cost me a penny.

Thank goodness for the NHS.

Lundi limerick #105

Thinking of Acton I’m glad

so special to Mum and to Dad

It’s where they first met

and their future was set

Such a wondrous life they both had.

 

There is not a lot to be said about Acton,  a small hamlet in Staffordshire. You could so easily drive through it without knowing and yet, without its existence, I may well not have existed!

The one building that is there, an old Wesleyan Methodist Church that closed in 2003, is where my father, Charles Matthews, went to Sunday School, then to Chapel. Where he met my mother Irene Lily Matthews, née Talbot. Where they first started courting,  all very prim and proper in those days. Where Dad first qualified for his  75 years as a Methodist Local Preacher.

I will add some photographs to a later post, and give a little more detail. I thought it appropriate that for the last of my two years worth of Lundi limericks (Lundi being french for Monday, for those who hadn’t noticed!!) I should write about somewhere extra special.

Thank you Acton. Thank you Mum and Dad.

 

 

 

Seventy Five Years In The Passing: A D-Day Tribute — Gloria Smud

This needs no introduction whatsoever, other than to say what a wonderful tribute it is.

Seventy Five Years In The Passing..A D-Day Tribute. Seventy five years in the passing, The 6th of June; brave troops amassing. Nobody knew how countless would pay, For saving our souls that proud D-Day. From hillsides, valleys, towns & moors, They set off, leaving British shores. A rendezvous of military purpose, They called it Piccadilly…

via Seventy Five Years In The Passing: A D-Day Tribute — Gloria Smud

The People of a Place — The Chatter Blog

For Paddy, and all those unsung heroes who are the salt of the earth, thanks to Colleen for introducing some of them to us.

We approached an Irish monument. I’m always excited to see the world as it used to be, or relics of it and use my imagination to create how I think it was. It was late in the day and only stragglers wandered about. As I stepped through the gates I could see an elderly man […]

via The People of a Place — The Chatter Blog

Song Lyric Sunday Theme for 12/05/2019 – Mom/ Mother/ Flowers

img_1345-3Thank you to Jim Adams, who tirelessly hosts Song Lyric Sunday and gives us the chance to share lots of favourite, and some not so familiar, songs.

The theme for this week is Mom/Mother/Flowers

If you fancy sharing one of your favourite songs you can find out how to participate, and also listen to all the great entries, here.

Obviously the theme this week is to help celebrate Mother’s Day, and today, 12th March we celebrate the most important people on the planet in the following countries:

Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, Aruba, Australia, Austria, Bahamas,Bangladesh, Barbados, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bermuda, Bhutan,Bonaire, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei, Cambodia, Canada, CaymanIslands, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo, Ivory Coast, Croatia, Cuba, Curaasao, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominica, Ecuador, Equatorial Guinea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, Germany, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Greece, Greenland, Grenada, Guyana, Honduras, Hong Kong, Iceland, India, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Kenya, Latvia, Liberia, Liechtenstein,Macau, Malaysia, Malta, Myanmar, Namibia, New Zealand, Netherlands, Pakistan, Papa New Guinea, Peru, Philippines, Puerto Rico, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Sint Maarten, Singapore, Slovakia, South Africa, Suriname, Switzerland, Taiwan, Tanzinia, Tonga, Trinidadand Tobago, Turkey, Uganada, Ukraine, United States, Uruguay, Vietnam, Venezuela, Zambia, Zimbabwe

As it is not Mother’s Day in the UK, or Mothering Sunday as my Mum would always point out to me, I am going to be self-indulgent and choose a song from my youth. I might even choose 2!

If you are a Mom, Mum, Mother, Ma, Mummy, or any other version of the name that epitomises the one person in the world that we can none of us do without, “Thank You” for your unique gift of life that you gave to us all. Happy Mother’s Day to you.

Please sit back, and enjoy some flowers in the rain, played by The Move (the first pop song to be played, in full, on BBC Radio 1):

Flowers in the Rain

The Move

Woke up one morning half asleep
With all my blankets in a heap
And yellow roses scattered all around
The time was still approaching four
I couldn’t stand it anymore
Saw marigolds upon my eiderdown

I’m just sitting watching flowers in the rain
Feel the power of the rain making the garden grow
I’m just sitting watching flowers in the rain
Feel the power of the rain keeping me good

So I lay upon my side
With all the windows open wide
Couldn’t pressurise my head from speaking
Hoping not to make a sound
I pushed my bed into the grounds
In time to catch the sight that I was seeking

I’m just sitting watching flowers in the rain
Feel the power of the rain making the garden grow
I’m just sitting watching flowers in the rain
Feel the power of the rain keeping me good

If this perfect pleasure has to be
Then this is paradise to me
If my pillow’s getting wet
I don’t see that it matters much to me

I heard the flowers in the breeze
Make conversation with the trees
Relieved to leave reality behind me
With my commitments in a mess
My sleep has gone away depressed
In a world of fantasy you’ll find me

I’m just sitting watching flowers in the rain
Feel the power of the rain making the garden grow
I’m just sitting watching flowers in the rain
Feel the power of the rain keeping me good

Watching flowers in the rain
Flowers in the rain
Power flowers in the rain
Flower power in the rain

Songwriters: WOOD ROY

Flowers in the Rain lyrics © S.I.A.E. Direzione Generale, Essex Music Inc., ESSEX MUSIC INC

The bonus is the song “San Francisco (Be Sure to Wear Flowers in Your Hair)” written by John Phillips, of The Mamas and Papas,  and sung by Scott McKenzie. It was released in May 1967, to promote the Monterey Pop Festival. Many young people, who would have wished to be there, were far away from the love and the music, fighting, and dying, in Vietnam. A few of their Moms will still be alive, so, today, I think of them.

 

I am Thankful — The happy Quitter!

We do not celebrate Thanksgiving in the UK. Perhaps we should.

In any case, I am thankful for many things, and often take those things for granted.

Thank you to all bloggers, whether I follow you, or not. Thank you for being part of a good world, and for sharing freely with others. Thank you to Bridget for posting this!

For the wife Who says it’s hot dogs tonight Because she is home with me And not out with someone else. For the husband Who is on the sofa Being a couch potato Because he is home with me And not out at the bars. For the teenager Who is complaining about doing dishes Because […]

via I am Thankful — The happy Quitter!