Song Lyric Sunday – 31 January 2021 – Even in the Shadows

Jim Adams’ Song Lyric Sunday gives us the chance to share familiar, and sometimes not so familiar, songs. This week the title or lyrics of the song must contain one of the words Even, or Odd.

If you fancy sharing one of your favourite songs you can find out how to participate, and also listen to all the great entries, here.

I’ve chosen a song this week off the album Dark Sky Island, by Enya.  I used a song off this album in October 2020, when Jim gave us a free choice.  “The Humming” can be  found here.

Eithne Pádraigín Ní Bhraonáin, known professionally as Enya, is an Irish singer, songwriter, record producer and musician.  Born into a musical family and raised in an Irish speaking area in County Donegal, Enya began her music career when she joined her family’s Celtic folk band Clannad in 1980 on keyboards and backing vocals. She left in 1982 with their manager and producer Nicky Ryan to pursue a solo career, with Ryan’s wife Roma Ryan as her lyricist.  She has sung in ten languages.

In 2008 Enya took a three-year break from music and spent time travelling, including visits to Ireland, Australia, and France, where she bought a new home, on its southern coast, and renovated it. Eventually, she caught up with her long-time collaborators, Nicky and Roma Ryan, to discuss ideas on the next album and when to start work.  At one meeting, Roma presented Enya with a collection of poems she had written about islands, one of which was about Sark in the English Channel, and they spoke about its designation as the first island to become a dark-sky preserve in 2011.

I’ve chosen to offer you “Even in the Shadows”.  I hope you enjoy it as much as I do.

Even in The Shadows

Even in the Shadows

Enya

Even in the shadows
I turn around
To find you walk away
And even when I whisper
The winds will come
To steal the words I say

I could fall and keep on falling
I could call and keep on calling
Wonder why this love is over
Wonder why it’s not forever more

Even in the silence
I hear my heart
It’s still a part of you
And even in the morning
When light has come
I don’t know what to do

I could fall and keep on falling
I could call and keep on calling
(Love may come…)
Wonder why this love is over
(…and love may go)
Wonder why it’s not forever

I could fall and keep on falling
I could call and keep on calling
(Love may come…)
Wonder why this love is over
(…and love may go)
Wonder why it’s not forever more

I could fall and keep on falling
I could call and keep on calling
(Love may come…)
Wonder why this love is over
(…and love may go)
Wonder why it’s not forever

I could fall and keep on falling
I could call and keep on calling
(Love may come…)
Wonder why this love is over
(…and love may go)
Wonder why it’s not forever more

Source: Musixmatch

Songwriters: Roma Ryan / Eithne Ni Bhraonain / Nicky Ryan

Song Lyric Sunday – 13 December 2020 – Orange Crush

Jim Adams’ Song Lyric Sunday gives us the chance to share familiar, and sometimes not so familiar, songs. Jim has given us Apple /Banana /Cherry /Olive /Orange /Strawberry this week to be included in the title or lyrics.

If you fancy sharing one of your favourite songs you can find out how to participate, and also listen to all the great entries, here.

The band I’m featuring this week is R.E.M. an American rock band from Athens, Georgia. The band was formed in 1980 by drummer Bill Berry, guitarist Peter Buck, bassist Mike Mills, and lead singer Michael Stipe, all of whom were students at the University of Georgia. They disbanded, amicably, in 2011.

Orange Crush was released as the first single from the band’s sixth studio album, “Green”, in 1988. It was not commercially released in the U.S. despite reaching number one as a promotional single It peaked at number 28 on the UK Singles Chart, making it the band’s then-highest chart hit in Britain.

The song’s title is a reference to the chemical defoliant Agent Orange used in the Vietnam War. Stipe opened the song during The Green World Tour by singing the U.S. Army recruiting slogan, “Be all you can be… in the Army.” Stipe’s father served in the Vietnam War.

I think R.E.M. were best when performing live. Here is a recording from a 2003 performance in Germany.

….and here a remastered studio recorded version

The middle section of the lyrics mimics the helicopters flying over and around to disperse the defoliant Agent Orange, used to destroy the overhead cover of the Viet Cong. Little did they realise that it was also destroying the lungs, and other organs, of the civilian population, and American soldiers and airmen. That legacy continues to kill people today!

Lyrics

I’ve got my spine, I’ve got my orange crush
(Collar me, don’t collar me)
I’ve got my spine, I’ve got my orange crush
(We are agents of the free)
I’ve had my fun and now it’s time to serve your conscience overseas
(Over me, not over me)
Coming in fast, over me (oh, oh)

I’ve got my spine, I’ve got my orange crush
(Collar me, don’t collar me)
I’ve got my spine, I’ve got my orange crush
(We are agents of the free)
I’ve had my fun and now it’s time to serve your conscience overseas
(Over me, not over me)
Coming in fast, over me (oh, oh)

High on the roof, thin the blood
Another one came on the waves tonight
Comin’ in, you’re home

We would circle and we’d circle and we’d circle to stop and consider and centered on the pavement stacked up all the trucks jacked up and our wheels in slush and orange crush in pocket and all this here county, hell, any county, it’s just like heaven here, and I was remembering and I was just in a different county and all then this whirlybird that I headed for I had my goggles pulled off; I knew it all, I knew every back road and every truck stop

I’ve got my spine, I’ve got my orange crush
(Collar me, don’t collar me)
I’ve got my spine, I’ve got my orange crush
(We are agents of the free)
I’ve had my fun and now it’s time to serve your conscience overseas
(Over me, not over me)
Coming in fast, over me (oh, oh)

High on the roof, thin the blood
Another one climbs on the waves tonight
Comin’ in, you’re home

High on the roof, thin the blood
Another one climbs on the waves tonight
Comin’ in, you’re home

Source: Musixmatch

Songwriters: Mills / Berry / Buck / Stipe

Orange Crush lyrics © Night Garden Music

Song Lyric Sunday – 6 September 2020 – Yanamamo

Jim Adams’ Song Lyric Sunday gives us the chance to share familiar, and sometimes not so familiar, songs. Jim has given us Musical/Opera this week rather than a choice of words to be included in the title or lyrics.

If you fancy sharing one of your favourite songs you can find out how to participate, and also listen to all the great entries, here.

I’m opting for a not so familiar song this week, from a musical that is normally performed by schoolchildren. I was lucky enough to attend a performance, probably 25 years ago now. It was very moving. The children had obviously spent a huge amount of time in learning, rehearsing, and performing the 90 minute work. Afterwards I bought a cassette tape (remember those) of the performance and played it often in the car whilst travelling to and from work.

Peter Anthony Rose MBE (music) and Anne Conlon MBE (words) are British writers best known for their environmental musicals for children. They were both teachers in Lancashire, England, for the majority of their creative achievements and most of their works have been written specially for St Augustine’s RC High School, Billington. At the time Peter Rose was their head of music. They wrote with a view to expanding the children’s knowledge of the world and the environment, perhaps hoping that their seeds would fall on fertile minds and help to make the world a better place.

In 1988 the US-based World Wildlife Fund (WWF) funded the musical Yanomamo, by Rose and Conlon, to convey what is happening to the people and their natural environment in the Amazon rainforest. It tells of Yanomami tribesmen/ tribeswomen living in the Amazon and has been performed by many drama groups around the world. Sadly, lessons were not learned and the Yanomami continue to endure massacres, disease, and a loss of more and more of their environment. What appeared to be a positive awakening of their plight was very short lived. The rest of the world calls it progress!

Yanomamo is a 90-minute work for chorus, soloists, narrator and stage band, and the original production, performed by the choir and musicians of St Augustine’s RC High School, was narrated by Sir David Attenborough and premiered at the Royal Institute, London, before appearing at the Edinburgh Festival. They later performed Yanomamo in America, narrated by Sting, which production was recorded for television and later broadcast (on Easter Sunday, 1989) on Channel 4 under the title of Song of the Forest. The TV version was commercially released by WWF. Since its publication the musical has seen performances by thousands of children throughout the world.

The lyrics are on the video which, unfortunately, is not very good quality. I hope you enjoy “Song of the Forest”

I talk to the trees………..

This popped up in my Facebook “memories” today. I thought it may be of interest, even though it is rather a long read.

Peter's pondering

Not only do I talk to the trees, I talk to all manner of things.

Each morning I go for a walk.

I have various routes, but all take in fields, woodland, the River Erewash, the Erewash canal, bridges, a main road, and suburban streets.

Some days I hardly see a living soul, others I see far too many!

My normal route takes me down my road, which has only some 9 houses. At the bottom of the road I have my first conversation, with a brazen hussy who rolls on the ground and will not let me pass before she is satisfied. Somewhere close by her brother will be watching. He is more timid and undemanding. Their Mummy lives at the end house and thinks they are both boys!

I explain that I have to get on, and continue on my way. She follows, then runs ahead. It is…

View original post 1,667 more words

Twittering Tales # 147 – 30 July 2019

It’s time again, for Kat Myrman’s wonderful challenge, to write a story, inspired by her picture prompt, in 280 characters or fewer.

Here is this week’s prompt and my contribution.

Check out all the fabulously creative entries here and, if you’ve never had a go, why not try a story of your own? You may surprise yourself!

beach-4365491_1280Photo by enriquelopezgarre at Pixabay.com

I had difficulty this week in coming up with a tale that I was happy with. In the course of trying, I discovered that  a coarse sand grain may have a diameter of 1/20th of an inch. A first-order approximation of the number of grains of sand in one cubic inch (assuming cubic arrangement, spherical grains, uniformly sized) would be 20 x 20 x 20, or 8,000.

I am still managing to learn new things, even at my vast age! Use this information wisely folks.

Instead of a tale I imagined all of the difficulties of keeping the family happy, and entertained, on a crowded beach.

Happy holiday

Lots of people twittering

most of them are littering

beach and ocean too

surely that’s not you

 

angry folk are bickering

bullies nasty snickering

what are we to do

what is that to you?

 

Mums and Dads with separate lives

wonder then that love survives

a rather dismal view

it’s really up to you

(280 characters)

Twittering Tales #135 – 7 May 2019

It’s time again, for Kat Myrman’s wonderful challenge, to write a story, inspired by her picture prompt, in 280 characters or fewer.

Here is this week’s prompt and my contribution.

Check out all the fabulously creative entries here and, if you’ve never had a go, why not try a story of your own? You may surprise yourself!

weather-phenomenon-4178465_1280Photo by jplenio at Pixabay.com

Carbon capture was great. The city could create pollution without fear of the consequences.  We kept on pumping the carbon emissions into the caves and fissures deep below our feet, and everything was fine.

Until, one day, the frackers breached the caves.

Not so great now is it!

(279 characters)

Click on Carbon capture and see if you think it is a good idea.