Sunday sayings #43

buddha1

By all means love each other, but first love yourself!

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Alone With My Bike

I’m shamelessly reblogging this because I added a little verse to the comments, and I rather like it. Also, if you haven’t ever read any of Colleen’s posts then you are missing out on some very wise words, some selfless, and often moving, observations, and the chance to get to know more about a lovely lady. I think Colleen should be prescribed to everyone as a pick me up!

The Chatter Blog

I got on my bike.

To be alone or so I wouldn’t be alone.

I’m not sure which.

Along the way I received waves,

Hellos,

Good mornings,

Thumbs up,

and

A few things I couldn’t decipher but they were said with smiles

So I accepted them with delight.

I met Judy who was on a bike for the first time in 15 years.

She was grateful for being on the bike and determined to resume her joy of biking.

I was appreciated her smiling face and her sharing her story with me.

I stopped to watch a muddy river.

It wasn’t so much roaring as it was rumbling,

I enjoyed the sound of it.

On the way back

I saw a damn snake.

And with that adrenaline I nearly flew over the next five miles.

There was no poetry to my day,

But maybe the rhythm of it lent to…

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Take a tip from Honey

31949396_1767087253337256_2449846145887764480_nMy niece lives on the Scottish coast, close to Edinburgh. She’s into ultra running, coaches and lectures on women’s health and fitness, and borrows this beautiful hound to accompany her on her runs. She served in the Army Reserve and did a tour in Afghanistan. I thought I would share the view, and her positive thought below.

Honey doesn’t give a shit if you missed your gym workout today, or even if you haven’t been for the last 2 weeks.
She’s waiting for you to make the next move, right now.
The only thing she’s concerned about is what’s happening right now, in this moment.
I think we can all learn something from Honey 😁🐾

A tribute to a colleague and friend

Yesterday I attended the funeral of Colin John Muge, a man who gave far more than he took, a man who served his community in so many ways, a man held in such love and high esteem that there was standing room only at the lovely secular service led by his wife, son, and two daughters.

Colin’s daughter, Catherine, played this cello music for the entrance.

All the family spoke lovingly and bravely, and two friends gave heartfelt tributes. We heard “Everyday” from Buddy Holly, “Misty” by Erroll Garner, “Heart of Glass” by Blondie, the poem “If I Be The First Of Us To Die” by Nicholas Evans, and the exit music was:

Afterwards, around 50 people enjoyed afternoon tea at Colin’s house.

Colin would have enjoyed it tremendously!

A life well lived.

Farewell my friend.

Life Lessons learned from a 2-year old

An interesting, and informative article from Daniel Rattner, via Bridget, The happy Quitter. If you head back to Daniel’s original post there are some interesting pictures of Ilya.

The happy Quitter!

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I often babysit the neighbor’s kids or they babysit me -however you want to look at it and there is a lot I learned from watching babies, toddlers and yes, even teenagers.

I wondered if I am the only one who looks at it that way. Does not being a parent make me more of a pushover or perhaps more observant?

Yesterday, I found by accident an article that made me feel good and of course, I have to share my finding with all of you. Here you go:

To start, I’m not a parent. I opted into a commune-style Brooklyn home I found on Craigslist, and I live with a young couple and their two-year-old, Ilya.

I’ve now been living there for one year and I can confidently say it’s one of the best decisions I’ve ever made. Because in my time living with a kid, I’ve come to…

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Next Year and Forever

Sending this seasonal, succinct, second hand sentiment because it is far better than I could have put into words. Happy New Year!

The happy Quitter!

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“I hope that in this year to come, you make mistakes.

Because if you are making mistakes, then you are making new things, trying new things, learning, living, pushing yourself, changing yourself, changing your world. You’re doing things you’ve never done before, and more importantly, you’re Doing Something.

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Optimistically Pessimistic Of Improvement

For those of you who have never heard of Cameron, have a look at his blog. It’s a story of determination, setbacks, more determination, and success.

The worlds biggest fridge magnet

Hi everyone.

Remember me?

Weird being back I must say.

It’s been a long long time.

I’m still yet to tell you all about my walk for charity, show you the pictures and tell you all about my blisters.

But before that, I thought I might just start by saying hello and apologising for not having been around for so long.

I’ve neglected the very people that had given me a welcome for so much of my weight loss adventure, and for that I am truly sorry.

It’s amazing really. To my mind nothing has changed in the past 18 months but that is because I have lived each day and don’t recognise the change, therefore it must be nigh on impossible to quantify the massive changes that have actually taken place.

During my blogging hiatus, I have been drunk and sober, happy and sad, lonely and content, busy and…

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The People Are The Difference

A lovely article, written by a lovely man, and shared by another lovely man, and I know neither of them, nor have I met them. It’s often the little things that make the biggest impact.

Mitigating Chaos

There was “something about Aiken” that I first noticed during my visits in early 1999.  We were considering buying the funeral homes and cemetery there and surely didn’t want to make a bad decision.   I didn’t feel the stress we sometimes felt in Columbia, where we had lived for three years. Aiken was different.  This guy and his wife, both from New Jersey, took the leap, purchased the businesses and moved to a beautiful, small Southern city.  th-3

Funeral service, like many businesses,  depends on the building of trusting relationships and following through on promises made.  I was fortunate to get acquainted with many community leaders and their help, guidance and example were invaluable. For me, it was the people that made Aiken different.

One of those people/leaders was Jeff Wallace. Jeff was the editor of The Aiken Standard for most of the years we owned our businesses.  We…

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