Smile time #1

There are many things in life that make me smile, and I like to smile! It is so much easier than frowning, or grimacing.

I have decided to, occasionally, pass things on that I happen across that  have made me smile. The first is something that I included in a comment on Colleen Brown’s lovely blog, The Chatter Blog. If you’ve never read any of Colleen’s words, or seen her delightful drawings, I can guarantee that you will find many a smile amongst her wise words and insightful sketches.

So, without further ado, here is my very first Smile time! The Ging Gang Goolie song.

It’s a gibberish song, widely spread around the world and popular among Scouts and Girl Guides as a campfire “round”. Originally Scandinavian. Sounds as though these are East European children. I bet you smiled!

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Twittering Tales #143 – 2 July 2019

It’s time again, for Kat Myrman’s wonderful challenge, to write a story, inspired by her picture prompt, in 280 characters or fewer.

Here is this week’s prompt and my contribution.

Check out all the fabulously creative entries here and, if you’ve never had a go, why not try a story of your own? You may surprise yourself!

car-repair-362150_1280.jpgPhoto by Ryan McGuire at Pixabay.com

Simon forced his eyelids apart, licked his dry lips, and looked down, with a sigh, at his wallet, now devoid of cash!

The last thing he remembered was staggering out of the club.

He looked up, and could see, immediately, that he and the Beetle had an identical problem.

Piston broke!

(280 characters)

If you have to explain a joke, it ceases to be a joke, but I’ll risk that.

In British English:

“Pissed” does not mean “very annoyed”, but it does mean “drunk”.

“Broke” means “having completely run out of money”.

There, one joke ruined, just like the piston!

 

Twittering Tales #122 – 5 February 2019 – It starts with one word…

It’s time again, for Kat Myrman’s wonderful challenge, to write a story, inspired by her picture prompt, in 280 characters or fewer.

Here is this week’s prompt and my contribution.

Check out all the fabulously creative entries here and, if you’ve never had a go, why not try a story of your own? You may surprise yourself!

classic-1834499_1280-1It starts with one word bt can’t contine mch frther becase this keyboard is tterly seless.
Jst how can I seflly se it?
Have yo not heard? Some stpid person called Trmp has decided to ban one of the letters!
He says it is nconstittional, and shold not be sed.
It’s jst pre rbbish.

Fck!

(279 characters)

On Ilkley Moor Baht ‘at

It is imperative that you all join in with the marvellous rendition of “On Ilkley Moor baht ‘at”. I will know if you don’t!

Nan's Farm-Inside Out

Where have you been since I saw you, I saw you? On Ilkley Moor without a hat

This week I went up to the moor, Ilkley Moor, where the  far reaching views are particularly beautiful, especially on a bright and clear sunny autumn day such as this one.

View from the moor

In my teens I did some walking on the moor with a group from the youth club.

Also in my teens and with friends, I came up to the isolated Cow and Calf hotel that stands almost at the top. We came to the disco nights that mushroomed in the 60s. The discotheque was in the large basement and occasionally there were live bands, complete with psychedelic and strobe lighting.

IMG_4953Ilkley Moor is part of the larger Rombald’s Moor, and lies directly above the lovely spa town of Ilkley, the moor is also home to a series of fascinating ancient monuments.

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Heard on a bus

There’s a woman in a niqab, talking to her son in a non-English language.

On the seat in front of them: a white man, who turns around and tells the woman that she’s in the UK and should be speaking English.

On the seat in front of the white man, is an elderly white woman who points out: “We’re in Wales, and she’s speaking Welsh.”

 

Mae yna fenyw mewn niqab, yn siarad â’i mab mewn iaith nad yw’n Saesneg.

Ar y sedd o’u blaenau: dyn gwyn, sy’n troi o gwmpas ac yn dweud wrth y wraig ei bod hi yn y DU a dylai fod yn siarad Saesneg.

Ar y sedd o flaen y dyn gwyn, mae’n fenyw gwyn oedrannus sy’n nodi: “Rydym ni yng Nghymru, ac mae hi’n siarad Cymraeg.”