A little bit of Dad

In my final Lundi limerick yesterday I used the hamlet of Acton and linked it to the fact that it played a large part in my Dad’s life.

In the process of digging out a bit of real life background, rather than the normal wikipedia, or google sources, I rummaged through the suitcase that I brought away from Dad’s house after he died at the grand age of 96.

Mum had died nearly 11 years before and everyone expected Dad to follow fairly swiftly after. He was, after all, a hard working farm labourer, who had relied on Mum for meals, clean clothes, and a welcoming home. We had all, of course, forgotten his hard upbringing, his determination, and his adaptability.

Within a couple of weeks he had bought himself a microwave. “I’ve always wanted one of these but your Mother would never have one”, he said.

He went on to cook his own meals, wash, dry, and iron his clothes, vacuum the house, and thoroughly enjoy the whole new leaf that he’d turned over. My little sister (three years older than me), who lived a few miles away, kept an eye on him, had him over for Sunday lunch and, over the coming years, gradually helped him more, according to his needs.

Anyway, this isn’t meant to be a definitive history of Dad, purely an extension of the information about his link to Acton.

The suitcase I mentioned earlier has quite a few Bibles, and other books, in it, each one has a story to tell. Dad was a Methodist Local Preacher from the age of 20 until failing hearing, and health, caused him to retire, although he remained ‘on the books’ until his death, and received several certificates of Long Service, even up to 75 years service! It just could not be done nowadays!

Dad was a marvellous preacher. Inspiring, knowledgeable, plain speaking, always linking to everyday life, articulate but never verbose. In everyday life you would never dream that he was a gifted and effective preacher. He was a quiet, mild mannered man whose goodness shone out for all to see, always willing to help, support, and encourage all that he encountered.

First out of the case is a School photograph from 1922 when Dad was 12
How smart they all are, and I love the bicycle parked around the corner! Dad would have done a couple of hours work before going to school and would have many jobs to complete when he got home.
Sunday School prize that Dad received from Acton
Note the Superintendent was John Matthews, an uncle
and a 19th birthday present from an Auntie
A present from the Local Preachers Association on his recognition service as a preacher (Oct 14th 1929)
21st birthday gift to Mum
An article that appeared in the Local Preachers Newsletter after Dad died

Lundi limerick #105

Thinking of Acton I’m glad

so special to Mum and to Dad

It’s where they first met

and their future was set

Such a wondrous life they both had.

 

There is not a lot to be said about Acton,  a small hamlet in Staffordshire. You could so easily drive through it without knowing and yet, without its existence, I may well not have existed!

The one building that is there, an old Wesleyan Methodist Church that closed in 2003, is where my father, Charles Matthews, went to Sunday School, then to Chapel. Where he met my mother Irene Lily Matthews, née Talbot. Where they first started courting,  all very prim and proper in those days. Where Dad first qualified for his  75 years as a Methodist Local Preacher.

I will add some photographs to a later post, and give a little more detail. I thought it appropriate that for the last of my two years worth of Lundi limericks (Lundi being french for Monday, for those who hadn’t noticed!!) I should write about somewhere extra special.

Thank you Acton. Thank you Mum and Dad.

 

 

 

Song Lyric Sunday – 6 September 2020 – Yanamamo

Jim Adams’ Song Lyric Sunday gives us the chance to share familiar, and sometimes not so familiar, songs. Jim has given us Musical/Opera this week rather than a choice of words to be included in the title or lyrics.

If you fancy sharing one of your favourite songs you can find out how to participate, and also listen to all the great entries, here.

I’m opting for a not so familiar song this week, from a musical that is normally performed by schoolchildren. I was lucky enough to attend a performance, probably 25 years ago now. It was very moving. The children had obviously spent a huge amount of time in learning, rehearsing, and performing the 90 minute work. Afterwards I bought a cassette tape (remember those) of the performance and played it often in the car whilst travelling to and from work.

Peter Anthony Rose MBE (music) and Anne Conlon MBE (words) are British writers best known for their environmental musicals for children. They were both teachers in Lancashire, England, for the majority of their creative achievements and most of their works have been written specially for St Augustine’s RC High School, Billington. At the time Peter Rose was their head of music. They wrote with a view to expanding the children’s knowledge of the world and the environment, perhaps hoping that their seeds would fall on fertile minds and help to make the world a better place.

In 1988 the US-based World Wildlife Fund (WWF) funded the musical Yanomamo, by Rose and Conlon, to convey what is happening to the people and their natural environment in the Amazon rainforest. It tells of Yanomami tribesmen/ tribeswomen living in the Amazon and has been performed by many drama groups around the world. Sadly, lessons were not learned and the Yanomami continue to endure massacres, disease, and a loss of more and more of their environment. What appeared to be a positive awakening of their plight was very short lived. The rest of the world calls it progress!

Yanomamo is a 90-minute work for chorus, soloists, narrator and stage band, and the original production, performed by the choir and musicians of St Augustine’s RC High School, was narrated by Sir David Attenborough and premiered at the Royal Institute, London, before appearing at the Edinburgh Festival. They later performed Yanomamo in America, narrated by Sting, which production was recorded for television and later broadcast (on Easter Sunday, 1989) on Channel 4 under the title of Song of the Forest. The TV version was commercially released by WWF. Since its publication the musical has seen performances by thousands of children throughout the world.

The lyrics are on the video which, unfortunately, is not very good quality. I hope you enjoy “Song of the Forest”

Apology to a spider – second leg – Rapid rhyme #29

I’m sorry Mrs Spider that I destroyed your home

I merely wished to walk your way whilst on my morning roam

I hope you soon restore the mess that I so rudely made

Please send the bill to me at once, it will be swiftly paid!

 

I went the same way once again to see if she was there

I found a cup and saucer smashed and half a broken chair

Her neighbour said she’d moved away, we talked of this and that

I understand that she has moved into a brand new flat

Police image of the perpetrator at the scene of the crime

First leg is here.

Lundi limerick #85

A lady I knew came from Trentham

had wobbly legs and oft bent`em

She had very strange powers

received lots of flowers

and never quite knew who had sent`em

 

Trentham, pronounced locally as Trent em, is on the way from Baldwins Gate, Newcastle, Staffordshire, where I grew up, to Longton, Stoke on Trent, where my future wife lived. I passed through there often!

It is a suburb of the city of Stoke-on-Trent in North Staffordshire, England, south-west of the city centre and south of the neighbouring town of Newcastle-under-Lyme. It is separated from the main urban area by open space and by the Trent and Mersey Canal and the River Trent, giving it the feel of a village.

 

Song Lyric Sunday – April 19 2020 – Home Town

song-lyric-sundayJim Adams’ Song Lyric Sunday gives us the chance to share familiar, and sometimes not so familiar, songs. This week Jim has asked us to find a song linked to our Home Town or City where we were born, or once lived.

If you fancy sharing one of your favourite songs you can find out how to participate, and also listen to all the great entries, here.

Well, I left home at the age of 16 and have lived in my current home for 27 years. In the intervening 29 years I lived in 42 different places and that is not counting the various tents, barns, woods, hedgerows, vehicles, factories, boats, ships, and ditches where I have laid my head, nor any holiday homes. I guess that Wherever I lay my hat that’s my home.

Live Rockpalast 1985

 

Wherever I Lay My Hat

Paul Young

By the look in your eye I can tell you’re gonna cry
Is it over me?
If it is, save your tears
For I’m not worth it, you see

For I’m the type of boy who is always on the roam
Wherever I lay my hat that’s my home
I’m telling you that’s my home
You had romance, did you break it by chance

Over me?
If it’s so I’d like for you to know
That I’m not worth it, you see
For I’m the type of boy who is always on the roam, mm

Wherever I lay my hat that’s my home
Mm, that’s my home
Oh, you keep telling me, you keep telling me I’m your man
What do I have to do to make you understand?

For I’m the type of guy who gives girl the eye
Everybody knows.
But I love them and I leave them
Break their hearts and deceive them everywhere I go

Don’t you know that I’m the type of man who is always on the roam
Wherever I lay my hat that’s my home
Wherever I lay my hat, oh oh, that’s my home, mm yeh
That’s my home

And I like it that way
You know I can’t make it all alone sometimes that’s the way, that’s the way
I’m not saying
I’m not saying I don’t love you
Just got to do what I want to do

Source: LyricFind

Songwriters: Barrett Strong / Marvin Gaye / Marvin P Gaye / Norman Whitfield / Norman J. Whitfield

Wherever I Lay My Hat lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

Of course, living near to Nottingham I could have chosen:

 

Song Lyric Sunday 15/12/2019 – Baby

song-lyric-sundayJim Adams, who hosts Song Lyric Sunday, gives us the chance to share lots of familiar, and some not so familiar, songs.

If you fancy sharing one of your favourite songs you can find out how to participate, and also listen to all the great entries, here.

My offering today  is by The Hollies who are one of the few UK groups of the early 1960s, along with the Rolling Stones, that have never disbanded and continue to record and perform. They also happen to be the group that I have seen more than any other – many, many times over the years.

It is a song released in 1970 that was a number one hit in Australia and New Zealand but never released as a single in the UK.

It tells the story, familiar at the time, of a young couple who have got married in spite of their parents telling them they were too young. The girl was pregnant, a huge stigma for all the family, and normally blamed on the girl with little blame being directed at the father. However, they did get married and, despite living on the breadline and only just keeping their heads above water, they have managed to raise a family. They struggle every day but both have a dream of better times ahead!

This song, written by Tony Hicks, contains the word “baby” twice, so fits the theme admirably. I do hope you enjoy it. There are two versions to choose from, a live performance recorded in a German TV studio, and the original recording.

Too Young to Be Married

The Hollies

She wakes up early every morning
She get up long before the sunshine
Greets the milkman who’s still yawning
And reads the paper for a short time
Calls the kids “get out of bed”
They never hear a word she says

Husband stands to leave the table
She says “I hope you have a good day”
He thinks “one day soon as I’m able
I’ll get a job where I get good pay.”

They find it hard to make ends meet
But they don’t mention it because they have each other
And love is free while they’re supposed to be …

Too young to be married
Too young to be free
Too young to be married
But what could they do? They were going to have a baby

After the kids have had their breakfast
Now they’re off to get some schooling
She cleans the house and makes the beds
She starts to dream but knows she’s fooling

She swears one day she’ll stay in bed
But for now she knows she’s got to keep on working
’cause round and round inside her head
She hears the words her mother said …

Too young to be married
Too young to be free
Too young to be married
But what could they do? They were going to have a baby

Too young to be married
Too young to be free
Too young to be married
But what could they do?

Source: LyricFind

Songwriters: Tony Hicks

Too Young to Be Married lyrics © Universal Music Publishing Group

Twittering Tales #158 – 15 October 2019

It’s time again, for Kat Myrman’s wonderful challenge, to write a story, inspired by her picture prompt, in 280 characters or fewer.

Here is this week’s prompt and my contribution.

Check out all the fabulously creative entries here and, if you’ve never had a go, why not try a story of your own? You may surprise yourself!

85a36dfe-b3a5-408f-88c0-b2661d152768Photo by Mikechie Esparagoza at Pexels.com

The Wall of Love

I was worried when the old fella next door didn’t show. We normally chatted every day.

His wife suffered with crippling arthritis for many years and rarely ventured out.

They said she’d been dead for weeks. He lay down beside her under their special wall. A testament to their love.

 

(280 characters)

Song Lyric Sunday 06/10/2019 – Bus /Truck /Lorry

img_1345-3Thank you to Jim Adams, who hosts Song Lyric Sunday and gives us the chance to share lots of familiar, and some not so familiar, songs.

If you fancy sharing one of your favourite songs you can find out how to participate, and also listen to all the great entries, here.

This week, for a complete change, I searched for a song that I had never heard before, that was outside of my normal choice of music, but one that fitted the bill for the prompt.

I came up with a song from Joe Nichols seventh studio album, It’s All Good,  released in November 2011.

The song tells a sad tale of a man who has lost his ride home, his chance of a romantic trip on a boat, and his girlfriend. All in all he’s having a pretty bad day, and it doesn’t look as though it’s going to get any better!

 

 

No Truck, No Boat, No Girl

Joe Nichols

Sun-burned and wonderin’, how I wound up here
Edge of a dock, one flip flop, half of a six-pack of beer
Seems like yesterday I was sittin’ on top of the world
And I watched it all just drive away
No truck, no boat, no girl.

Layin’ out there on that water, is where we ought to be
Instead I’m stuck with no ride home and no you here with me
Seems like yesterday I was sittin’ on top of the world
All it takes is one mistake,
No truck, no boat, no girl.

If I could I’d drive a line and catch a bite to eat
Put my zip-code in my tackle box there behind the seat

The water’s turnin’ smooth as glass, the sun is goin’ down
A red seagull’s blowin’ by makin’ one last lap around
Seems like yesterday I was sittin’ on top of the world
I’m just bobbin’ in the wake
No truck, no boat, no girl.

Seems like yesterday I was sittin’ on top of the world
Man ain’t meant to live this way
No truck, no boat, no girl.
Some things just can’t be replaced
No truck, no boat, no girl.

Source: LyricFind

Songwriters: Adam Wright / Jay Knowles

No Truck, No Boat, No Girl lyrics © Kobalt Music Publishing Ltd., Peermusic Publishing, Words & Music A Div Of Big Deal Music LLC