Twittering Tales #119 – 15 January 2019

It’s time again, for Kat Myrman’s wonderful challenge, to write a story, inspired by her picture prompt, in 280 characters or fewer.

Here is this week’s prompt and my contribution.

Check out all the fabulously creative entries here and, if you’ve never had a go, why not try a story of your own? You may surprise yourself!

campfire-1846142_1280Photo by Pexel @ Pixabay.com

At the native American theme park, the false fire glow, created by the LED’s, wasn’t very realistic and, on closer inspection, the pots were made of some sort of plastic. The smell of cooking was pretty authentic though. No doubt intended to lure us to the overpriced food outlets!

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Twittering Tales #117 – 1 January 2019

It’s time again for Kat Myrman’s wonderful challenge to tax our creativity. Just take her photo prompt and write a story, inspired by the prompt, in 280 characters or fewer.

Here is this week’s prompt and my contribution.

Check out all the fabulous entries here and, if you’ve never had a go, why not try a story of your own? You may surprise yourself!

parrot-846074_1920-1Photo by Free-Photos at Pixabay.com

This follows on from my Lundi limerick #16 of yesterday

Polly’s dream

I’m sick of this cabbage and carrot diet. Look, it’s turning my tail feathers green!
Thank goodness it’s Christmas.
Maybe I’ll get some plum pudding, and there’s bound to be some nuts and fruit going spare.
I’m hoping there may be stilton and port left over too.
Now we’re talking!

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I am Thankful — The happy Quitter!

We do not celebrate Thanksgiving in the UK. Perhaps we should.

In any case, I am thankful for many things, and often take those things for granted.

Thank you to all bloggers, whether I follow you, or not. Thank you for being part of a good world, and for sharing freely with others. Thank you to Bridget for posting this!

For the wife Who says it’s hot dogs tonight Because she is home with me And not out with someone else. For the husband Who is on the sofa Being a couch potato Because he is home with me And not out at the bars. For the teenager Who is complaining about doing dishes Because […]

via I am Thankful — The happy Quitter!

Burns Night……

Thank you to David for the reminder that I have an excuse to partake of a wee dram tonight (not that an excuse is ever needed). A little reminder of who Rabbie is can be found here.

DAVID OAKES - IMAGES.

13-ROBERT-BURNS-BIRTH-PLACE,-ALLOWAY,-AYRSHIRE----0148

Robert Burns Birthplace…

In this humble Alloway Farmhouse on 25th January 1759 Robert (Rabbie) Burns was born.

In a short life he was a prolific Writer and Poet, work that won him respect and a respect that is still honoured today the 25th January….Burns Night.

Burns Night…the night to respect the National Poet of Scotland, when Haggis, Tatties and Neaps are piped into the room to sound of Bagpipes,  the centrepiece of many a Burns Night Dinner.

25th January

(C) David Oakes 2018

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Optimistically Pessimistic Of Improvement

For those of you who have never heard of Cameron, have a look at his blog. It’s a story of determination, setbacks, more determination, and success.

The worlds biggest fridge magnet

Hi everyone.

Remember me?

Weird being back I must say.

It’s been a long long time.

I’m still yet to tell you all about my walk for charity, show you the pictures and tell you all about my blisters.

But before that, I thought I might just start by saying hello and apologising for not having been around for so long.

I’ve neglected the very people that had given me a welcome for so much of my weight loss adventure, and for that I am truly sorry.

It’s amazing really. To my mind nothing has changed in the past 18 months but that is because I have lived each day and don’t recognise the change, therefore it must be nigh on impossible to quantify the massive changes that have actually taken place.

During my blogging hiatus, I have been drunk and sober, happy and sad, lonely and content, busy and…

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Just an Old Soup Bowl

What a good, if very disturbing article, about changing eating habits over the years!

The happy Quitter!

soup dish

It all started out with an old soup dish that I found at a resale shop, it reminded me of the soup bowls we used when I was a child. They were so much smaller than the ones I have in my kitchen cabinet now. Come to think of it, everything was smaller back then and so were we.

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Twittering Tale #56 – 31 October 2017

It’s time again for Kat Myrman’s wonderful challenge to tax our creative souls. Just take her photo prompt and write a story, inspired by it, in 140 characters or fewer.

This week we have three pictures to work with, and my contribution uses all three. Check out all the fabulous entries here.

Pumpkin Mom looked out over her brood, fondly remembering the romps in the hay bales!
Granny, wrapping her stole around, smiled knowingly.

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All at sea – Flying through the air, with, and without, the aid of a helicopter.

This is part of a recollection of “Some things I’ve done that you probably haven’t.

Number 2, Transferred between Royal Naval ships at sea by Jackstay, and 3, Transferred between Royal Naval ships at sea by helicopter can be recounted together because normally, when you go on a journey, you want to end up back where you started!

When I was posted to Gibraltar we (The Army) often entertained Royal Naval personnel when they had shore leave. We invited them to functions in the various messes (Officers Mess/Warrant Officers and Sergeants Mess/Other ranks Mess, and we invited them to dine with us, often arranging a special dinner.

 In return, they reciprocated, and we were often invited on board ship.

 I came to know several of the Petty Officers of HMS Charybdis quite well, during 1976. I was invited to spend time at sea with the ship, in an exchange with a member of the ship’s crew, where we swapped jobs for a few days.

hms charybdis Life on board a Royal Naval vessel is unlike anything you may imagine. Space is at a premium and everything has to be stowed away to maximise space, and to ensure there are no hazards created by loose gear.

 Before departing from any port, the ship must be fully provisioned with fuel, stores, ammunition, food, and a myriad of items you wouldn’t even begin to think of. This is to ensure that, should the vessel be called upon to sail into conflict, or to aid others, it can proceed immediately, without having to stock up first. There is a good deal of manual labour involved in this, and the whole ships company (of 260 in this case) is put to work, less a few essential personnel. It is hard work, and I experienced it!

 Imagine having to stock a freezer so you can retrieve food, to feed 260 hungry people for 2 months, when you can only reach things right at the front. Just where do you put all those potato sacks, carrots, toilet rolls, extra large cans, butter, fat, oil, flour, spices. The list is huge, as is the quantity. You cannot run out.

 I shall not go into disposal of waste, recycling, or what can, under international law, be discharged into the sea. I mention it only because sometimes it flies off the ship!

 Whilst at sea it is sometimes necessary to load, or offload personnel, or materiel.

 This may be for changes in personnel, removal of severely ill, or deceased, replenishment of food, fuel, supplies, and the removal of waste for disposal, or recycling.

 The Royal Navy is supported at sea by Royal Fleet Auxiliary (RFA) vessels.

The RFA is staffed by civilians, and they have a variety of ships that can supply fuel and stores, effect repairs at sea, and even supply hospital facilities. They have a helicopter on board, and also cranes mounted on either side.

 Most modern warships have a helicopter on board, or a helipad that can receive a visiting helicopter so stores can be transferred from one vessel to another by underslung load. However, there is a restriction on how much weight can be carried that way, and it is an expensive method of resupply.

 The alternative method of transfer is by Jackstay, a method of using ropes and pulleys to carry personnel and materiel between vessels.
jackstay trfs

The light jackstay, employing human power, is used for transferring personnel, provisions, and light stores with a maximum load of about 250kg. The hauling end of the jackstay is manned by up to 25 hands. The other end is secured by a grommet strop to slip in the receiving ship. A traveller block is hauled back and forth along the jackstay wire by an in–haul rope in the receiving ship and an out–haul rope in the delivering ship manned by up to six crew in each ship. Working distance limits are normally between 24–61 meters with a normal working distance of about 34 meters.

 The heavy Jackstay, uses steel ropes for transfer of heavier loads, or to support feed pipes during transfer of fuel or water. Normally a powered winch is used.

 The ropes are passed from one ship to the other by first firing a thin twine by rifle and pulling this across, with increasing thickness of twine, then cord, then rope.

 Ships are unstable platforms when stopped in most seas and it is extremely dangerous to bring two ships directly alongside one another. All transfers are therefore done with the ships steaming side by side, in to the wind, at a distance determined by the state of the seas. It is a hazardous operation and constant adjustment is needed to ensure identical speed, and to ensure the distance between vessels does nor vary. The procedure needs to be practiced often to ensure the crew knows exactly what to do when the need arises. It is the ultimate in team work!

 This is how I came to “volunteer” for my first, and only, experience of transfer at sea by Jackstay, and return by helicopter. I was one of a dozen.

 Having watched others being hauled across from Charybdis to another visiting Frigate, it was soon my turn. Apart from a little dampness from sea spray I arrived safely on the other ship and was hurried along to the stern to jump into the helicopter for the return trip. This was only my second flight in a helicopter. The whole procedure took less than 30 minutes, but was very exhilarating!

 Flights by small helicopter are normally from, and to, a stable surface, and the take off pattern is normally a vertical lift into the air, transferring into forward flight whilst gaining height. Larger helicopters use a running takeoff and landing whenever possible.

 Taking off from, and landing on, a ship at sea, entails a helipad moving at quite a speed, often with buffeting wind, and large chunks of solid metal very close by. It is a very specialised skill!

 On take off, the aircraft has to rise off the pad and move to the left, or right, immediately moving away from the vessel.

 Landing is the more difficult skill. The helicopter must approach the vessel from the rear and then fly, at the speed of the ship, slightly to the left or right of the helipad. It then has to move slowly across so that it is hovering above the pad, but is, in fact, still flying forwards at the speed of the vessel. It must then drop down on to the moving deck, immediately ceasing forward flight.

 Naval pilots, I salute you!

 To the crews of both vessels, Thank you for not getting me wet!charybdis.jpg

 

HMS Charybdis was affectionately  called “The Cherry B.” Hence the cherry tree on the ship’s plaque.

 

 

 

Light Jackstay information courtesy of: MacFarlane, John M. (2013) Jackstay Transfer (Replenishment) at Sea. Nauticapedia.ca 2013. http://nauticapedia.ca/Articles/Jackstay_Transfer.php

Twittering Tale #51 – 26 September 2017

It’s time again for Kat Myrman’s wonderful challenge to tax our creative souls. Just take her photo prompt and write a story, inspired by it, in 140 characters or fewer.

harvest-2733443_1280 Here is this week’s prompt and my contribution. Check out all the fabulous entries here.

Each year he offered the first of the crop to his darling wife.

This year she was not there to receive it.
Gone.
The apple of his eye forever!

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