Song Lyric Sunday 04/08/2019 – Song from a TV Show

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Thank you to Jim Adams, who hosts Song Lyric Sunday and gives us the chance to share lots of familiar, and some not so familiar, songs.

If you fancy sharing one of your favourite songs you can find out how to participate, and also listen to all the great entries, here.

The theme for this week posed a bit of a problem for me as I could quite happily live without television in my life!

I was 14 when we first had a television. Black and white of course, and only one channel. At 16, I joined the army and went to college for 3 years. No television. At 19 I deployed to the Middle East. No television. At 21 I went to Germany. Very little television. My daughter grew up with Sesame Street in German. So it goes on. I watched TV intermittently. Today, if the television is on, the chances are that I am reading blogs rather than watching it.

However, I think it is impossible to be untouched by television. I have seen a fair selection along the way, and one thing I MUST see, when it is on, is Later……with Jools Holland. He is a consummate musician and performer in his own right and , over the years, has introduced a gargantuan list of artists of every genre imaginable, and then some! You can see the list here.  

So I thought here we have a huge number of songs I can use for my SLS choice this week.

WRONG!

Instead, I suddenly thought of one show that I found to be both funny, thought provoking, and, at times, downright sad!

M*A*S*H (an acronym for Mobile Army Surgical Hospital) was an American war comedy-drama television series that aired on CBS from 1972 to 1983. It was developed by Larry Gelbart, adapted from the 1970 feature film M*A*S*H, which, in turn, was based on Richard Hooker’s 1968 novel MASH: A Novel About Three Army Doctors. The series, which was produced with 20th Century Fox Television for CBS, follows a team of doctors and support staff stationed at the “4077th Mobile Army Surgical Hospital” in Uijeongbu, South Korea, during the Korean War (1950–53). The show’s title sequence features an instrumental-only version of “Suicide Is Painless,” the original film’s theme song. The show was created after an attempt to film the original book’s sequel, M*A*S*H Goes to Maine, failed. The television series is the best-known of the M*A*S*H works, and one of the highest-rated shows in U.S. television history. (wikipedia)

This was, of course, being shown at the time of the Vietnam War, and was highly controversial. What started out as a comedy, with drama overtones soon became a drama with added comedy!

It’s a long time ago now, but I seem to remember that the “squaddie” humour really came across well, and could evoke real feelings of sadness, even the odd tear or two.

Suicide Is Painless is a song written by Johnny Mandel (music) and Michael Altman (lyrics). It was the theme song for both the movie and TV series M*A*S*H.

Director Robert Altman had two stipulations about the song for Mandel: it had to be called “Suicide Is Painless” and it had to be the “stupidest song ever written”. Altman attempted to write the lyrics himself, but upon finding it too difficult for his 45-year-old brain to write “stupid enough,” he gave the task to his 14-year-old-son Michael, who wrote the lyrics in five minutes. Ironically, the son’s income from royalties for the song far exceeded his father’s income for the film.

So here it is. The Tongue-in-cheek theme song for the very sad tongue in cheek comedy about the Korean war. The film was released in 1970, at the height of the Vietnam war, and the TV series debuted in 1972, appealing to the growing anti war crowd, lasted 11 years, and was arguably one of the most successful series ever.

The TV series used instrumental versions of the song only.

Suicide Is Painless

Johnny Mandel

Through early morning fog I see
Visions of the things to be
The pains that are withheld for me
I realize and I can see

That suicide is painless
It brings on many changes
And I can take or leave it if I please

The game of life is hard to play
I’m gonna lose it anyway
The losing card I’ll someday lay
So this is all I have to say

Suicide is painless (suicide)
It brings on many changes (changes)
And I can take or leave it if I please

The sword of time will pierce our skins
It doesn’t hurt when it begins
But as it works its way on in
The pain grows stronger
Watch it grin

Suicide is painless
It brings on many changes
And I can take or leave it if I please

A brave man once requested me
To answer questions that are key
Is it to be or not to be
And I replied oh why ask me?

Suicide is painless
It brings on many changes
And I can take or leave it if I please

And you can do the same thing if you please

Source: LyricFind

Songwriters: Johnny Mandel / Michael B Altman

Suicide Is Painless lyrics © Warner Chappell Music, Inc

 

 

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Song Lyric Sunday 28/07/2019 – A song featured prominently in a movie – The Watchmen.

img_1345-3Thank you to Jim Adams, who hosts Song Lyric Sunday and gives us the chance to share lots of familiar, and some not so familiar, songs.

If you fancy sharing one of your favourite songs you can find out how to participate, and also listen to all the great entries, here.

The theme for this week is “A song featured prominently in a movie.”  Now, it depends on your definition of prominently doesn’t it! Music is pretty important to the movie industry, and a film can become a huge success, or failure, purely because of the choice of music.

The movie that I’ve chosen has 53 different songs, so it cannot really be argued that any of them feature prominently.

Watchmen is a 2009 American superhero film directed by Zack Snyder, based on the 1986–87 DC Comics limited series of the same name.  Both a soundtrack and excerpts from Tyler Bates‘ film score were released as albums on March 3, 2009. The soundtrack features three songs written by Bob Dylan—”Desolation Row“, “All Along the Watchtower” and “The Times They Are a-Changin’“—with only the latter performed by Dylan on the soundtrack. It includes some songs mentioned in the comic, such as Simon and Garfunkel’s “The Sound of Silence” and Leonard Cohen’s “Hallelujah“. Dylan’s “The Times They Are a-Changin'” and “All Along the Watchtower” are also quoted in the graphic novel.

I think my choice of video gives you not only a classic song but also a good idea of what to expect of the film. I hope you enjoy it.

The Times They Are A-Changin’ (Witmark Demo – 1963)

Bob Dylan

Come gather ’round, people
Wherever you roam
And admit that the waters
Around you have grown
And accept it that soon
You’ll be drenched to the bone
If your time to you is worth savin’
And you better start swimmin’
Or you’ll sink like a stone
For the times they are a-changin’

Come writers and critics
Who prophesize with your pen
And keep your eyes wide
The chance won’t come again
And don’t speak too soon
For the wheel’s still in spin
And there’s no tellin’ who
That it’s namin’
For the loser now
Will be later to win
For the times they are a-changin’

Come senators, congressmen
Please heed the call
Don’t stand in the doorway
Don’t block up the hall
For he that gets hurt
Will be he who has stalled
The battle outside ragin’
Will soon shake your windows
And rattle your walls
For the times they are a-changin’

Come mothers and fathers
Throughout the land
And don’t criticize
What you can’t understand
Your sons and your daughters
Are beyond your command
Your old road is rapidly agin’
Please get out of the new one
If you can’t lend your hand
For the times they are a-changin’

The line it is drawn
The curse it is cast
The slow one now
Will later be fast
As the present now
Will later be past
The order is rapidly fadin’
And the first one now
Will later be last
For the times they are a-changin’

Source: LyricFind

Songwriters: Bob Dylan

The Times They Are A-Changin’ (Witmark Demo – 1963) lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, Audiam, Inc

Lots of information gleaned, and copied, from Wikipedia, to whom I regularly donate. It is a free service but can only remain so if supported by its users!

Song Lyric Sunday Theme for 04/11/2018 – Take a look at me now.

img_1345-3Helen’s theme for SLS this week is take/taking. Fancy joining in with this great way of listening to some old favourites, and, often, some new music? If so, you can see all of the entries here and read all about the way to get involved.

This week I’ve chosen a song from Phil Collins,  written for the movie of the same name, “Against All Odds”. The song is better known as “Take a look at me now”.

Originally titled “How Can You Just Sit There?”, the song was initially from the sessions for Collins’ debut solo album Face Value (1981). Collins wrote the song, while Arif Mardin produced it.  The piano performance is by New York musician Rob Mounsey. Piano, keyboard bass, and a string section, arranged and conducted by Mardin, were recorded at RCA Studios, New York, while Collins recorded vocals and drums in Los Angeles.

The video has a hunky male form for those who are interested in that sort of thing. Yes, I’m thinking of you Sandra!

Lyrics are on the video too! Enjoy.

Song Lyric Sunday Theme for 03/06/2018

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Helen’s theme for this week is “Smile”. It was supposed to be “Simile” apparently, but I’m happy the way it turned out.

My immediate thought was a song based on the instrumental theme used in a film that came out the year my big sister was born.

In 1936 Charlie Chaplin starred in Modern Times, a film based on the Great Depression. The theme tune had lyrics added in 1954 which were based on the lines, and themes, of the film. This was recorded, as Smile, by Nat King Cole, and the rest, as they say,  is history.

In looking for a worthy version to offer I discovered Madeleine Peyroux, and what a discovery she is. I do hope you enjoy this, but more than that, I hope that the video really does make you smile. It is delightful.

Madeleine Peyroux – Smile Lyrics

Smile though your heart is aching
Smile even though it’s breaking
When there are clouds in the sky, you’ll get by
If you smile through your fear and sorrow
Smile and maybe tomorrow
You’ll see the sun come shining through for youLight up your face with gladness
Hide every trace of sadness
Although a tear may be ever so near
That’s the time you must keep on trying
Smile, what’s the use of crying
You’ll find that life is still worthwhile
If you just smileLight up your face with gladness
Hide every trace of sadness
Although a tear may be ever so near
That’s the time you must keep on trying
Smile, what’s the use of crying
You’ll find that life is still worthwhile
If you just smile

That’s the time you must keep on trying
Smile, what’s the use of crying
You’ll find that life is still worthwhile
If you just smile

Songwriters: Charles Chaplin, John Turner, Geoffrey Parsons
Smile lyrics © BOURNE CO.

Song Lyric Sunday Theme for 25/03/2018 – Seeing.

SLSHelen has set the theme for this week as “Seeing”.

I’m going to become really nostalgic this week and opt for a quintessential love song that was written in 1938 and,  I imagine, predates everyone who will read this.

There have been many recordings of this song over the years and I am offering what I consider to be the best two.

The song is “I’ll be seeing you”, and here is my all-time favourite version.

A modern version that I consider really does justice to the emotions of the song is here:

The feelings expressed really are timeless.

I’ll Be Seeing You

Billie Holiday

I’ll be seeing you
In all the old familiar places
That this heart of mine embraces
All day through
In that small cafe
The park across the way
The children’s carousel
The chestnut trees
The wishing well

I’ll be seeing you
In every lovely summer’s day
In everything that’s light and gay
I’ll always think of you that way

I’ll find you in the morning sun
And when the night is new
I’ll be looking at the moon
But I’ll be seeing you

I’ll be seeing you
In every lovely summer’s day
In everything that’s light and gay
I’ll always think of you that way

I’ll find you in the morning sun
And when the night is new
I’ll be looking at the moon
But I’ll be seeing you

Songwriters: Irving Kahal / Sammy Fain

I’ll Be Seeing You lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, BMG Rights Management US, LLC

Song Lyric Sunday Theme for 3/18/18 – Shadow

SLSShadow is Helen’s prompt for this week and it immediately made me think “The Shadows“. They were the backing group for Cliff Richard, from 1958, and so were a huge influence, for me, from the age of 10.

The song I’ve chosen is very appropriate for a 10 year old – “The Young Ones“, the title song from their 1961 film, which in the USA was called “It’s Wonderful to Be Young.” Oh, how innocent it all seems now!

The Young Ones

Cliff Richard

The young ones
Darling, we’re the young ones
And young ones
Shouldn’t be afraid

To live, love
While the flame is strong
‘Cause we may not be the young ones
Very long

Tomorrow
Why wait until tomorrow?
‘Cause tomorrow
Sometimes never comes

So love me
There’s a song to be sung
And the best time is to sing it
While we’re young

Once in every lifetime
Comes a love like this
Oh, I need you and you need me
Oh, my darling, can’t you see?

Young dreams
Should be dreamed together
And young hearts
Shouldn’t be afraid

And some day
When the years have flown
Darling, then we’ll teach the young ones
Of our own

Once in every lifetime
Comes a love like this
Oh, I need you and you need me
Oh, my darling, can’t you see?

Young dreams
Should be dreamed together
And young hearts
Shouldn’t be afraid

And some day
While the years have flown
Darling, then we’ll teach the young ones
Of our own

Songwriters: Roy C. Bennett / Sid Tepper

The Young Ones lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, Warner/Chappell Music, Inc

The 1000 words a day challenge

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Debbie, a blogging colleague, and friend, has set herself a 1,000 words a day challenge for the New Year, and yes, she does write with a pen! See what she says here:

The 1000 words a day challenge

Debbie is relatively new to the blogosphere but has already had success in writing a script for a small budget film, produced in Derby. You can read about this here:

https://wordpress.com/read/post/id/88188102/19

allotment

I particularly enjoyed her short story about making soup with produce from an allotment. See it here:

https://wordpress.com/read/post/id/88188102/17

I think Debbie is very talented. See what you think!

 

It’s oh so quiet…

If you haven’t read Haylee’s blog yet, now is the time to start. Funny, thought provoking, informative and a joy to behold! Follow the dotted line………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Aloada Bobbins

It’s oh so still…Sshh, Sssh!

I wish. In fact, it’s the complete opposite. What with December birthdays to plan, get-togethers and school being crazy busy at this time of year, there’s no wonder I was in bed by 9.45pm on a Friday night. Part-Ay to the B = bed!

Oh, and then there’s a small little celebration coming up, where generally everyone spends, eats and stresses too much for a single day. I’m sure that only weddings equal the amount of pre-planning put into Christmas based on length of festivities. It’s only 24 hours though…we can do this!

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Except, I can’t do it all very well whilst blogging. Not if I want to make sure I don’t wrap a child in festive paper, add categories and hashtags to presents and give you all detention if you don’t read my posts! 😉

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