Song Lyric Sunday – 27 December 2020 – Heart of the Country

Jim Adams’ Song Lyric Sunday gives us the chance to share familiar, and sometimes not so familiar, songs. Jim has given us Odor /Scent /Smell /Taste this week to be included in the title or lyrics.

If you fancy sharing one of your favourite songs you can find out how to participate, and also listen to all the great entries, here.

This week I’m pondering on the final concert, and the final public performance, of The Beatles, Paul and Linda McCartney’s move to the Mull of Kintyre, and the beauty of that part of the world. I was fortunate to live in the Outer Hebrides for two years, based in Ballivanich, on the Isle of Benbecula. Wild, sparsely populated, enduring some tremendously strong winds and wild weather but beautiful, captivating, and instilling a sort of desert fever in those who are lucky enough to experience it.

The Beatles’ final paid concert of their career took place on 29 August 1966 at Candlestick Park in San Francisco, California. The band played to an audience of 25,000, leaving 7,000 tickets unsold. They had become disillusioned with live performances, singing the same songs time and again, unable to hear themselves playing. They had upset many fans with John’s statement that The Beatles were more popular than Jesus.

The Beatles’ rooftop concert on 30 January 1969 marked the end of an era for many fans. The group did record one more album, Abbey Road — on which work started the following month — but by September 1969 the Beatles had unofficially disbanded.

To save some money from the taxman and as a bolt hole from Beatlemania, Paul had, encouraged by then girlfriend Jane Asher, bought High Park Farm in Campbeltown, near Argyll’s Mull of Kintyre in 1968. But it was only when newly married to American Linda Eastman in 1969 that he decided to make it a home.

He said: “Going up to Scotland was real freedom. It was an escape – our means of finding a new direction in life and having time to think about what we really wanted to do.”

The farm, which was rustic to say the least, would become home to Linda’s daughter Heather and the couple’s first child Mary. Stella, now a top fashion designer, arrived in 1971.

But it was also the place where Paul’s next music project was born.

The new expanded editions of Wild Life and Red Rose Speedway include never-before-seen pictures of the McCartneys’ life in Campbeltown, which in time would inspire his love letter to the area – Mull of Kintyre – a 1977 Christmas No1. 

They released the album ‘Ram’ together in 1971 and formed the band Wings in the same year. The couple were also nominated for an Oscar for their song ‘Live And Let Die’, the theme tune for the 1973 Bond film of the same name.

“When she came to Britain and we got to together the greatest thing about it was we both wanted to be free. We did what we wanted and she took pictures of it all.”

Linda McCartney died after a battle with breast cancer on April 17, 1998. She was 56 years old. 

The song I’m offering is Heart of the Country from the album Ram released in 1971.

The video shows some great examples of the free and easy life in their dream home. A great place to raise their children, grow their own food, ride in deserted areas (UK horseriders may note they use American style saddles and tack), and generally enjoy life.

The song aint bad either!

If you want to see more then there is some lovely pics, and music, at the bottom of the lyrics.

I look high, I look low

I’m lookin’ everywhere I go

Lookin’ for a home

In the heart of the country

I’m gonna move, I’m gonna go

I’m gonna tell everyone I know

Lookin’ for a home

In the heart of the country

Heart of the country

Where the holy people grow

Heart of the country

Smell the grass in the meadow

Whoa, whoa, whoa

Want a horse, I want a sheep

I wanna get me a good night’s sleep

Living in a home

In the heart of the country

I’m gonna move, I’m gonna go

I’m gonna tell everyone I know

Livin’ in a home

In the heart of the country

Heart of the country

Where the holy people grow

Heart of the country

Smell the grass in the meadow

Whoa, whoa, whoa

Want a horse, I got a sheep

I’m gonna get me a good night’s sleep

Livin’ in a home

In the heart of the country

I’m gonna move, I’m gonna go

I’m gonna tell everyone I know

In the heart of the country

Heart of the country

Where the holy people grow

Heart of the country

Smell the grass in the meadow

Whoa, whoa, whoa

A little bit of Dad

In my final Lundi limerick yesterday I used the hamlet of Acton and linked it to the fact that it played a large part in my Dad’s life.

In the process of digging out a bit of real life background, rather than the normal wikipedia, or google sources, I rummaged through the suitcase that I brought away from Dad’s house after he died at the grand age of 96.

Mum had died nearly 11 years before and everyone expected Dad to follow fairly swiftly after. He was, after all, a hard working farm labourer, who had relied on Mum for meals, clean clothes, and a welcoming home. We had all, of course, forgotten his hard upbringing, his determination, and his adaptability.

Within a couple of weeks he had bought himself a microwave. “I’ve always wanted one of these but your Mother would never have one”, he said.

He went on to cook his own meals, wash, dry, and iron his clothes, vacuum the house, and thoroughly enjoy the whole new leaf that he’d turned over. My little sister (three years older than me), who lived a few miles away, kept an eye on him, had him over for Sunday lunch and, over the coming years, gradually helped him more, according to his needs.

Anyway, this isn’t meant to be a definitive history of Dad, purely an extension of the information about his link to Acton.

The suitcase I mentioned earlier has quite a few Bibles, and other books, in it, each one has a story to tell. Dad was a Methodist Local Preacher from the age of 20 until failing hearing, and health, caused him to retire, although he remained ‘on the books’ until his death, and received several certificates of Long Service, even up to 75 years service! It just could not be done nowadays!

Dad was a marvellous preacher. Inspiring, knowledgeable, plain speaking, always linking to everyday life, articulate but never verbose. In everyday life you would never dream that he was a gifted and effective preacher. He was a quiet, mild mannered man whose goodness shone out for all to see, always willing to help, support, and encourage all that he encountered.

First out of the case is a School photograph from 1922 when Dad was 12
How smart they all are, and I love the bicycle parked around the corner! Dad would have done a couple of hours work before going to school and would have many jobs to complete when he got home.
Sunday School prize that Dad received from Acton
Note the Superintendent was John Matthews, an uncle
and a 19th birthday present from an Auntie
A present from the Local Preachers Association on his recognition service as a preacher (Oct 14th 1929)
21st birthday gift to Mum
An article that appeared in the Local Preachers Newsletter after Dad died

Rapid rhyme #30

None of us are poets, it’s very plain to see

we write some words and if they rhyme then it was meant to be

but there again if words don’t rhyme it doesn’t mean it’s prose

It may be verse, or something worse, a finger up your nose

 

None of us are poets, it’s why I wrote these words

to prove to you it’s very true that cows are seen in herds

A bull will come along to serve, that is his given task

He’s making love to cows all day and doesn’t have to ask

 

None of us are poets, I think I’ve proved that fact

but have a go, it’s fun to do, just sign the poet’s pact

Stand on your head, write with your toes, and sing a happy ditty

For those of you who think they know the rhyming word is kitty

Special Bonds

Spare a few minutes to view this delightful story posted by Bridget, The happy Quitter. Smiles guaranteed, oohs and aahs are optional!

The happy Quitter!

Leia and patches first night.jpg

Animals never fail to surprise me. I work in animal rescue for many years, and always when I think I have seen it all, along comes a story that touches my heart and makes me smile for days.

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Yay, Yay it’s Saturday…

The pet that poops breakfast has to be one of the best advertising slogans ever!

LadiesWhoLunchReviews,etc

22D26ADA-0AAC-47BC-9FC0-B1AC19464DB1Roosters and chicken running amok are still pretty prevalent on Kauai.  This is one of several that walk around our resort everyday, especially by the outdoor bar and grill, waiting for people to finish their meal.  And crowing.  Loudly.  At any time of the day.

From what I know, Hurricane Iniki decimated the island back in 1992 and that’s when the chickens and roosters’ coops and hen houses were destroyed; chickens having been originally brought over for food and roosters for cock fighting.  Now they are more feral than domesticated and if you’re not prepared for them running loose, it’s quite a sight and sound!  But I also understand they keep the island’s bug population way down.  I kind of enjoy them now and even have a rooster Christmas tree ornament from Kauai!

And here’s a little meme from Facebook that fits right in…

chickens poop breakfast

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Twittering Tale #56 – 31 October 2017

It’s time again for Kat Myrman’s wonderful challenge to tax our creative souls. Just take her photo prompt and write a story, inspired by it, in 140 characters or fewer.

This week we have three pictures to work with, and my contribution uses all three. Check out all the fabulous entries here.

Pumpkin Mom looked out over her brood, fondly remembering the romps in the hay bales!
Granny, wrapping her stole around, smiled knowingly.

(137 characters)

Twittering Tale #51 – 26 September 2017

It’s time again for Kat Myrman’s wonderful challenge to tax our creative souls. Just take her photo prompt and write a story, inspired by it, in 140 characters or fewer.

harvest-2733443_1280 Here is this week’s prompt and my contribution. Check out all the fabulous entries here.

Each year he offered the first of the crop to his darling wife.

This year she was not there to receive it.
Gone.
The apple of his eye forever!

(140 characters)

Service Paradigms

This explains so much about modern life!

Mitigating Chaos

   Recalling my Mt. St. Mary’s College, Intro to Sociology class back in 1978, it was the first time I heard the term “Paradigm”. Dr. Chris Smith, asked the class for the definition of the word?  No one seemed to know, so he provided the answer, “Twenty cents.”
***
   Back to the story.
I often become confused when I hear the word Service used with these agencies:
Internal Revenue ‘Service’
United States Postal ‘Service’  th                                         
Telephone ‘Service’                                           
Cable TV  ‘Service’                                               
Civil ‘Service’                                           
Federal state, city, & public  ‘Service’
Customer ‘Service’

   What they do is not what I thought  ‘Service’ meant.  
 
   But today, I overheard two farmers talking, and one said he had hired a bull to  ‘Service’ a few cows.
 
   BAM !!!   It all came into focus.
   Now I understand what all those agencies are doing to us!!!!!!!!    

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All Creatures Great and Small

A great story here from Nan’s Farm. Well worth a read – and a follow!

Nan's Farm

Part One – The Sheep

The sheep minus the lambs

We’ve all done those trips down memory Lane haven’t we?  My own trips often include the cast of ‘All Creatures Great and Small’.  Sheep, pet lambs, goats, ponies, cats, dogs, chickens, rabbits, hamsters and a couple of parrots that all became part of our family.

Right now, it’s the beginning of August and as usual at this time of year, the lambs have been separated from the yews and have been moved a mile up the hill to fresh grazing.  I enjoy watching the lambs grow and still feel a twinge of sadness when it’s time for them to move on, their mothers however, appear to get over it in less than twenty four hours!

When our children were young we all looked forward to springtime and the new lambs. It was a time when if we were lucky, we would have the opportunity to bottle feed the pet…

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