Twittering Tales #113 – 4 December 2018 – A taste of justice

Time again for Kat Myrman’s wonderful challenge to tax our creativity. Just take her photo prompt and write a story, inspired by it, in 280 characters or fewer.

Here is this week’s prompt and my contribution. Check out all the fabulous entries here and, if you’ve never had a go, why not try a story of your own? You may surprise yourself!

wolf-skeezePhoto by Skeeze at Pixabay.com

A taste of justice

I can see you Henry Roy James, and I know you can see me!

But you don’t recognise me.

You still think you got away with it, but really, you didn’t!

The jury may have believed you, but natural justice shall prevail.

You killed me, and I’m going to kill you.

Then I’m going to eat you!

(279 characters)

Advertisements

Remember: not just Who and When, but also understand Why — babbitman

This makes so much sense to me. I hope it may make you think beyond the ceremony of remembrance!

Wars kill people. They devastate families. Wars should be a politician’s absolute last resort and they are an admission that they have failed their people.

via Remember: not just Who and When, but also understand Why — babbitman

Twittering Tales #103 – 25 September 2018

It’s time again for Kat Myrman’s wonderful challenge to tax our creative souls. Just take her photo prompt and write a story, inspired by it, in 280 characters or fewer.

img_3008.jpg

Here is this week’s prompt and my contribution. Check out all the fabulous entries here.

1471340896569

Branching out into horrible humour

The tree had become quite a tourist attraction.
57 pairs of shoes in the branches.
114 uppers, 114 laces, 114 throats, 114 tongues, and 114 heels.
Beneath the tree there were only half that number of tongues, all belonging to the 57 bodies buried there!

Please pray for their souls!

(279 characters)

 

Song Lyric Sunday Theme for 29/07/2018

img_1345-3Helen has chosen “Street” as the theme for this week. You can listen to all the great music here.

My choice came to me immediately, but I thought I’d wait around a while to see if anyone else chose it. So far as I can see, nobody has.

The Kinks were formed in 1964, and I believe that they are the only group from that era whose original four members are still alive. Indeed, it was announced in June 2018 that three of the original line up have reformed to make a new album, and, possibly, to tour.

They were tremendously successful, performing from 1964 to 1996, and even had Rod Stewart as lead singer at one stage.

Ray Davies wrote most of their songs, and was an observational writer, penning songs about what he experienced around him, often commenting on the vast differences between the “haves” and “have nots”.

The song I’ve chosen is just such an observation, looking at some poor individual wondering “what are we living for?” He can’t see the point, and considers he can only end up dying on “Dead End Street.” I’m not sure that a great deal has changed!  I’ve actually chosen a version by Ray Davies and Amy Macdonald, just because I think it is really good!

Dead End Street

The Kinks

There’s a crack up in the ceiling,
And the kitchen sink is leaking.
Out of work and got no money,
A Sunday joint of bread and honey.

What are we living for?
Two-roomed apartment on the second floor.
No money coming in,
The rent collector’s knocking, trying to get in.

We are strictly second class,
We don’t understand,
(Dead end!)
Why we should be on dead end street.
(Dead end!)
People are living on dead end street.
(Dead end!)
Gonna die on dead end street.

Dead end street (yeah)
Dead end street (yeah)

On a cold and frosty morning,
Wipe my eyes and stop me yawning.
And my feet are nearly frozen,
Boil the tea and put some toast on.

What are we living for?
Two-roomed apartment on the second floor.
No chance to emigrate,
I’m deep in debt and now it’s much too late.

We both want to work so hard,
We can’t get the chance,
(Dead end!)
People live on dead end street.
(Dead end!)
People are dying on dead end street.
(Dead end!)
Gonna die on dead end street.

Dead end street (yeah)
Dead end street (yeah)

People live on dead end street.
(Dead end!)
People are dying on dead end street.
(Dead end!)
Gonna die on dead end street.

Dead end street (yeah)
Dead end street (yeah)
Dead end street (yeah)
Head to my feet (yeah)
Dead end street (yeah)
Dead end street (yeah)
Dead end street (yeah)
How’s it feel? (yeah)
How’s it feel? (yeah)
Dead end street (yeah)
Dead end street (yeah

Songwriters: Raymond Douglas Davies
Dead End Street lyrics © Warner/Chappell Music, Inc

The original Kinks version, complete with an early pre video promotional film, can be seen here.

As a bonus you can see a version by Shakey Graves, Wild Child, and Marmalakes, all touring as Outside City Limits, here. IT REALLY IS GOOD.

Song Lyric Sunday Theme for 17/06/2018

img_1345-3Helen’s theme this week is seconds/minutes/hours.

Well, that gives plenty of scope. Practically every single artist will, at one time (see what I did there?) , have recorded a song with some time reference in it.

I am going with the very first thing that came to mind. That is “My grandfather’s clock.”

You can, if you wish, follow the words with the recording by Johnny Cash, which is here.

My Grandfather’s Clock

Song by Johnny Cash

My grandfather’s clock was too large for the shelf
So it stood ninety years on the floor
It was taller by half than the old man himself
Though it weighed not a pennyweight more

It was bought on the morn of the day that he was born
And was always his treasure and pride
But it stopped, short never to go again
When the old man died

Ninety years without slumbering
His life seconds numbering
It stopped, short never to go again
When the old man died

My grandfather said that of those he could hire
Not a servant so faithful he found
For it wasted no time and had but one desire
At the close of each week to be wound

And it kept in its place, not a frown upon its face
And its hands never hung by its side
But it stopped short, never to go again
When the old man died

It rang and alarmed in the dead of the night
An alarm that for years had been dumb
And we knew that his spirit was pluming for flight
That his hour for departure had come

Still the clock kept the time with a soft and muffled chime
As we silently stood by his side
But it stopped short, never to go again
When the old man died

Ninety years without slumbering
His life seconds numbering
It stopped short, never to go again
When the old man died

Songwriters: Erich Doll / Henry Clay Work

However, I also offer this instrumental version by Leroy Troy. I don’t think he gets out much, apart from performing his clawhammer style of banjo playing!

A tribute to a colleague and friend

Yesterday I attended the funeral of Colin John Muge, a man who gave far more than he took, a man who served his community in so many ways, a man held in such love and high esteem that there was standing room only at the lovely secular service led by his wife, son, and two daughters.

Colin’s daughter, Catherine, played this cello music for the entrance.

All the family spoke lovingly and bravely, and two friends gave heartfelt tributes. We heard “Everyday” from Buddy Holly, “Misty” by Erroll Garner, “Heart of Glass” by Blondie, the poem “If I Be The First Of Us To Die” by Nicholas Evans, and the exit music was:

Afterwards, around 50 people enjoyed afternoon tea at Colin’s house.

Colin would have enjoyed it tremendously!

A life well lived.

Farewell my friend.

Twittering Tales #78 – 3 April 2018

It’s time again for Kat Myrman’s wonderful challenge to tax our creative souls. Just take her photo prompt and write a story, inspired by it, in 280 characters or fewer.

city-1487891_1280

I’ve been absent for a few weeks and have missed not taking part.

Here is this week’s prompt and my contribution. Check out all the fabulous entries here.

Meet me after the battle he said.

Just have to dash to Bosworth Field he said.

Then ZAP!…..I find myself transported in time to this deserted car park in Leicester.

The local paper says it is 2012. I left Richard in 1485. How can that be?

And just where is my Sovereign Liege?

(277 characters)