Lundi limerick #47

Flamingos spend time in cold water

most probably more than they oughta

With one legged stance

they do love to dance

and woo a girl ‘til they have caught her

 

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Song Lyric Sunday 16/06/2019 – Dad /Father /Barbecue

img_1345-3Thank you to Jim Adams, who tirelessly hosts Song Lyric Sunday and gives us the chance to share lots of favourite, and some not so familiar, songs.

The theme for this week, Dad/ Father/ Barbecue, is apt in some ways for anyone in the United Kingdom in that it is Father’s Day, as it is for the vast majority of countries, although not all. However, we are experiencing some pretty awful rainy weather at the moment so you’ll have to forgive me if I pass on the Barbecue!

If you fancy sharing one of your favourite songs you can find out how to participate, and also listen to all the great entries, here.

Not everyone wants to be a Dad, although, for me, I reckon it is one of the best things in the world.

I consider myself very blessed to have been able to be responsible for my little girl, and to have seen her grow up into a fine young lady, and to get married to a marvellous, loving, and caring husband. So, to celebrate that fact, I have chosen to share with you Daddy’s Little Girl written by Robert Burke and Horace Gerlach in 1949, and recorded by Steve Conway, in 1950.

Steve was one of Britain’s leading 20th Century popular singers. Born Walter James Groom in Bethnal Green, on 20 October 1920, he came from a very poor East End family. He began his singing career in local talent contests before being spotted by Reg Morgan and Charlie Chester (it was Chester who originated the stage name Steve Conway). Together they ran the Victory Publishing Company and managed to get Conway an audition for the BBC. Steve Conway appeared on several BBC shows and also began to appear on the club circuit, singing for such orchestras as Joe Loss, Maurice Winnink and Lew Stone. As Steve Conway’s career progressed so too did his popularity both in the UK and in America, with celebrities such as Bob Hope seeing Conway live. Arguably his best remembered broadcasts came in the Sunday afternoon series “Sweet Serenade”. Later he broke into post-war television work which began with the variety show “Melody And Mirth”. Steve Conway was plagued with a heart condition for most of his life. He died in London’s Guys Hospital, following surgery, on 19 April 1952, at the age of only 31. His death received wide coverage in both the musical and national press. He was cremated at Golders Green Crematorium on the 25th April following a service at 2:30PM. A congregation of about 100 attended which included bandleaders, vocalists, musicians, recording executives, music publishers, song writers, artistes, agents, managers and reporters. Amongst the many wreaths from fans and stars alike was one from his daughter. It was in the shape of a miniature chair inscribed “Daddy’s Little Girl”, a poignant memory of his hit song.”

Bio by: Kieran Smith

Daddy’s Little Girl

You’re the end of the rainbow, my pot of gold
You’re daddy’s little girl to have and hold
A precious gem is what you are
You’re mommy’s bright and shining star

You’re the spirit of Christmas, my star on the tree
You’re the Easter Bunny to mommy and me
You’re sugar, you’re spice, you’re everything nice
And you’re daddy’s little girl

Little girl of mine with eyes of shining blue
Little girl of mine I love you, yes I do
No one else could be so sweet
You have made my life complete

You’re the end of the rainbow, my pot of gold
You’re daddy’s little girl to have and hold
A precious gem is what you are
You’re mommy’s bright and shining star

You’re the treasure I cherish, so sparkling and bright
You were touched by holy and beautiful light
Like angels that sing, a heavenly thing
And you’re daddy’s little girl

I am adding links to alternative versions below. The Mills Brothers recording is particularly good, but there are very many versions and the song has become quite a popular Father/Daughter first dance at weddings.

The Mills Brothers

Al Martino

Michael Bublé

 

Song Lyric Sunday Theme for 26/05/2019 – Cool /Groovy /Hip /Nifty /Radical /Swell

img_1345-3

Thank you to Jim Adams, who tirelessly hosts Song Lyric Sunday and gives us the chance to share lots of favourite, and some not so familiar, songs.

The theme for this week is all about something, or someone, that is special or awesome, and I’m choosing COOL to offer a song that I think fits the bill perfectly.

If you fancy sharing one of your favourite songs you can find out how to participate, and also listen to all the great entries, here.

I don’t listen to this song often, but, when I do, so do my neighbours! It is made for dancing and, if you fancy letting your hair down, I would turn up the volume and choose the extended Meow mix at the bottom.

“Long Cool Woman (In A Black Dress)” gets ’em up every time. It was a huge hit back in early 1972 when it peaked at #2 for two weeks, kept out of the top spot by Gilbert O’Sullivan’s poignant “Alone Again (Naturally)”. The Hollies got started with Allan Clarke and Graham Nash first meeting back in 1962, with Eric Haycock and Don Rathbone joining soon after. Tony Hicks became the fifth and final member when they were signed to EMI Records in the UK. During that time, they released classic Brit Pop like “Bus Stop”, “Stop Stop Stop”, “On A Carousel” and “Carrie Anne”. They shifted into the the 70’s with Allan testifying to brotherhood of man with “He Ain’t Heavy, He’s My Brother”. Soon, band members quit with Allan Clarke going solo in 1971. After the break up, One track from their final LP “Distant Light” was this rockin’ dance tune that did not do well in the UK, and they expected it to tank in the US too. “Long Cool Woman (In A Black Dress)” did just the opposite, the song proved irresistable to the Americans, who took it to their heart and never forgot about it. Clarke delivers a Grammy-worth effort along with his bandmates that sounds worlds away from the inner tensions that had already broken up the band. The success of this one led Clarke to reconsider and rejoined the band in 1973, recording “The Air That I Breathe”, a #6 ballad and another rock classic. Clark flew the coop again but returned, recording “Russian Roulette” with the band in 1976 and in 1983 Graham Nash’s return reunited them and they had a #29 hit with their cover of 60’s chestnut “Stop! In The Name Of Love”. I always think of Cher when I hear this one…cos she WAS the long cool lady in a black dress.

DJDiscoCatV2
Published on 21 Sep 2018

The lyrics are included on this video.

If you want to see a version showing the group, here is a video of a TV performance,  but they are miming to a recording, as they often did at that time.

If you really want to dance here is the Extended Meow Mix!

https://youtu.be/MNXDlSt9nJ8

Song Lyric Sunday Theme for 10/03/2019- Animal

img_1345-3Thank you to Jim Adams, who hosts Song Lyric Sunday, and gives us the chance to share lots of favourites, and some not so familiar songs.

The theme for this week is Animal. If you fancy sharing some of your favourite songs you can find out how to participate, and also listen to all the great entries here.

I wonder how many songs we’ll have by The Animals this week, I hope there are a few. Formed in 1962, and with 4 of the original 5 still playing! How great is that?

I’m offering you an REM song this week and, guess what, it’s called Animal! I’ve chosen a recording of the performance in Wiesbaden, from 2003. I hope you enjoy it

Animal

R.E.M.

Hey what’s the big deal?
Tell me how to feel?
I know where we boomeranged and fell from grace.
Point me to the stars I’m up for the chase.
I know where we fell on our face.
Jump with me.
You jump with me.

Hey, what’s the big deal?
I’m an animal.
I’m an animal.
I’m an animal.

I don’t want to boomerang.
I don’t want to cannonball.
I’m not angling.
I don’t want to fall.
Tell me I’m the anchor of my own ascension.
Tell me I’m a tourist in the fourth dimension?

Hey, what’s the big deal?
I’m an animal.
I’m an animal.
I’m an animal.

Work it out.

I am vibrating at the speed of light.
Take my hand, we’ll wind up the night.
Spin me, win me, lift me, kiss me.
Trip me, cuss me, bend me, trust me,
Touch me now.
You take my hand.
You trust me now
You understand.

So what’s the big deal?
I’m an animal.
I’m an animal.
I’m an animal.

I am vibrating at the speed of light.

Songwriters: Jonathan Shave / Richard Cowie / Jason Pebworth / George Astasio / Jon Mills / Connor Maynard / Sophie Stern / Kurtis Mackenzie / Joey Dyer
Animal lyrics © EMI Music Publishing, Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, Warner/Chappell Music, Inc, Universal Music Publishing Group

As a bonus I am also including a fabulous performance of The Dying Swan, from The Carnival of the Animals. Such beauty in both dance, and music!

 

 

 

Pinpricks of light amid the darkness — bluebird of bitterness

Quokkas twice in a day has to be some sort of record.

Apart from that, this is really lovely, and well worth a look at the original too. There are some nice people around, and you don’t have to look far to find them!

 

Recently Sunny Skyz posted a collection of the most wholesome tweets of 2018. I’m recycling a few of my favorites here. See them all here.

via Pinpricks of light amid the darkness — bluebird of bitterness