Because it is nice #1

I remember a long ago teacher warning all of her pupils never to use the word NICE because it wasn’t a proper word, It wasn’t nice!

The derivation is rather strange:

Middle English (in the sense ‘stupid’): from Old French, from Latin nescius ‘ignorant’, from nescire ‘not know’. Other early senses included ‘coy, reserved’, giving rise to ‘fastidious, scrupulous’: this led both to the sense ‘fine, subtle’ (regarded by some as the ‘correct’ sense), and to the main current senses.

However, I rather like the word, and I shall use it because I think it is NICE.

Geoff Le Pard posted a film review yesterday which mentioned that one of the main characters was an Oud player.

Now, it just so happens that I knew what an Oud was, but I wanted to know where the instrument originated from so I entered the long and dark tunnel known as Google, and then Wikipedia, and this is part of what I found:

The first known complete description of the ‛ūd and its construction is found in the epistle Risāla fī-l-Luḥūn wa-n-Nagham by 9th-century Philosopher of the Arabs Yaʻqūb ibn Isḥāq al-Kindī.[9] Kindī’s description stands thus:

“[and the] length [of the ‛ūd] will be: thirty-six joint fingers – with good thick fingers – and the total will amount to three ashbār.[Notes 1] And its width: fifteen fingers. And its depth seven and a half fingers. And the measurement of the width of the bridge with the remainder behind: six fingers. Remains the length of the strings: thirty fingers and on these strings take place the division and the partition, because it is the sounding [or “the speaking”] length. This is why the width must be [of] fifteen fingers as it is the half of this length. Similarly for the depth, seven fingers and a half and this is the half of the width and the quarter of the length [of the strings]. And the neck must be one third of the length [of the speaking strings] and it is: ten fingers. Remains the vibrating body: twenty fingers. And that the back (soundbox) be well rounded and its “thinning” (kharţ) [must be done] towards the neck, as if it had been a round body drawn with a compass which was cut in two in order to extract two ‛ūds“.[10]

I just love that language. It is so much better than modern idioms, youth speak, or Essex garbage. That, in itself, is worthy of NICE.

But (and my favourite teacher would be horrified that I started a sentence with but) I then went on to discover this absolute gem of music, and this is REALLY NICE.

So, not only do we have a nice review of a nice film from the nice Geoff Le Pard but we also have some really nice descriptive language, followed by some very nice music.

I think this deserves a new occasional series of NICE things. I hope it gifts you a smile today.

Song Lyric Sunday – 20 December 2020 – A wheel within a wheel

Jim Adams’ Song Lyric Sunday gives us the chance to share familiar, and sometimes not so familiar, songs. Jim has given us Circle /Polygon /Square /Triangle this week to be included in the title or lyrics.

If you fancy sharing one of your favourite songs you can find out how to participate, and also listen to all the great entries, here.

This week I didn’t have to go round in endless circles to find a song and I shall not even begin to tell you the joke about the missing parrot.  Instead, I’ll just get on with telling you that  I have chosen what I consider to be a captivating song from a film that first aired in 1968, starring Steve McQueen and German actress Astrid Heeren. The title song was performed by Noel Harrison who took the song to #8 in the UK Singles Chart. It won the Academy Award for Best Original Song in 1968.

A version by Sting was used in the 1999 remake of the film which, this time, starred Pierce Brosnan and Rene Russo. The trailer can be viewed here.

The song is Windmills of Your Mind and the film is The Thomas Crown Affair

Live performance from Orange, France 2012 Vocal: Sinne Eeg Piano: Jacob Christoffersen

A cover by Alison Moyet

Joe Hisaishi & New Japan Philharmonic World Dream Orchestra

And the glider sequence from the 1968 film

The flying sequence and Noel Harrison background music,” Windmills of Your Mind”, was the only part of the movie to receive an Oscar.

Windmills of Your Mind

Noel Harrison

Round like a circle in a spiral, like a wheel within a wheel
Never ending or beginning on an ever spinning reel
Like a snowball down a mountain, or a carnival balloon
Like a carousel that’s turning running rings around the moon
Like a clock whose hands are sweeping past the minutes of its face
And the world is like an apple whirling silently in space
Like the circles that you find in the windmills of your mind!
Like a tunnel that you follow to a tunnel of its own
Down a hollow to a cavern where the sun has never shone
Like a door that keeps revolving in a half forgotten dream
Or the ripples from a pebble someone tosses in a stream
Like a clock whose hands are sweeping past the minutes of its face
And the world is like an apple whirling silently in space
Like the circles that you find in the windmills of your mind!
Keys that jingle in your pocket, words that jangle in your head
Why did summer go so quickly, was it something that you said?
Lovers walking along a shore and leave their footprints in the sand
Is the sound of distant drumming just the fingers of your hand?
Pictures hanging in a hallway and the fragment of a song
Half remembered names and faces, but to whom do they belong?
When you knew that it was over you were suddenly aware
That the autumn leaves were turning to the color of her hair!
Like a circle in a spiral, like a wheel within a wheel
Never ending or beginning on an ever spinning reel
As the images unwind, like the circles that you find 
In the windmills of your mind!

Source: LyricFind

Songwriters: Marilyn Bergman / Michel Legrand / Alan Bergman

Windmills of Your Mind lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, BMG Rights Management

Twittering Tales #161 – 5 November 2019

It’s time again, for Kat Myrman’s wonderful challenge, to write a story, inspired by her picture prompt, in 280 characters or fewer.

Here is this week’s prompt and my contribution.

Check out all the fabulously creative entries here and, if you’ve never had a go, why not try a story of your own? You may surprise yourself!

img_5619Photo by Michael Gaida @ Pixabay.com

 

The Health and Safety inspection for the opening of the new children’s dance studio wasn’t going well.

Everyone thought somebody else was going to organise the clean up.

Someone would be in deep trouble!

 

Who was responsible was anyone’s guess.

I’m sure somebody knows.

 

I don’t. Do you?

 

(280 characters)

The Knife Angel

We have been experiencing increasing knife crime in the UK, with the majority of cases affecting our young men and boys. Deaths are increasing and there are few towns that have not experienced death or serious injuries. The police have regular knife amnesties, and seize weapons when they find them.

As part of the campaign to draw attention to this useless waste of life and the seriousness of carrying knives, a huge sculpture, made of blades of all shapes and sizes that have been handed in, or seized, has been created. It is called The Knife Angel.

You can read about the Knife Angel here or see the inspiration behind it, its creation, and its current location in Derby in the videos below.

Incidentally, the little map of Derby, shown in the link above, shows MHA “Methodist Homes for the Aged” , where I worked for 17 years prior to retirement.

 

 

Who Paints The Sky? — Gloria Smud

Over at Gloria Smud, Debbie’s Dad has been busy, as usual, helping to paint some really glorious skies. Pop over and hear all about it. You will not be disappointed.

Who Paints The Sky? Who has the job of painting the sky, Who owns the ladders to reach up so high, Who knows which colourful palletes delight, Perpetual artwork designed to excite! A fracture appears at the breaking of dawn, A slither of pink cracks; the new day is born. A blank canvas waits for…

via Who Paints The Sky? — Gloria Smud

Iron Nick — Little Fears

Pete, from Little Fears, was kind (or silly) enough to invite me to guest write for his fantastic site Little Fears. here is my feeble attempt to be half as funny, or punny, as Pete is. Pop over to his site to see his regular laughs by following the link below.

Thank you for this opportunity Pete!

To view the video you will need to go to the Little Fears site via the link at the bottom.

Iron Nick By Peter Matthews Iron Nick was really quite cheesed off. His boss kept badgering him to work harder. He was getting pretty steamed up about it all. Lucy, meanwhile, was egging Nick on. She advised him to tell the boss where to stick his lousy job. It became so heated that the three…

via Iron Nick — Little Fears

Twittering Tale #99 – 28 August 2018

It’s time again for Kat Myrman’s wonderful challenge to tax our creative souls. Just take her photo prompt and write a story, inspired by it, in 280 characters or fewer.

horses-1759214_1280.jpg
Prompt photo by Conquero at Pixabay.com

Here is this week’s prompt and my contribution. Check out all the fabulous entries here.

The hunt

I really think I’ve cracked it now.

Even though I say so myself, the form of the horses is quite superb.
My painting is almost like a photograph.
I’m really pleased with the result!

It’s such a pity that I can’t paint human figures, or dogs, or saddles, reins, or stirrups.

Tally Ho!

(280 characters)