Lundi limerick #79

Charlie the clown came from Zelah

he was peculiar fella

His nose was so big

he looked like a pig

and his eyes were a very deep yella

 

Zelah is a village in Cornwall, England, approximately 5 miles (8 kilometres) north of Truro. Zelah is the largest settlement in the civil parish of St Allen. The parish population in the 2001 census was 435.

In picking this village, at random, I discovered a strange happenstance.

Happenstance is, I think, my favourite word. Life is full of them, and I always delight in finding, encountering, and living through them…….Anyway, back to the happenstance.

 

E R Kelly’s Directory of Cornwall lists two public houses in the village in the 1883 entry and shows on the map both The Hawkins Arms – licensee Mr John Borlase and just behind to the east the Half-Moon Public House – licensee John Jose.

Now, I live in a small town which boasts a pub called the Sir John Borlase Warren, named after Admiral Sir John Borlase Warren,1st Baronet GCB GCH PC (2 September 1753 – 27 February 1822) who was a British Royal Navy officer, diplomat and politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1774 and 1807. He was born in this town.

Whether the two were related, I have no idea, but it does seem a rather strange happenstance, and that makes me very happy!

I am easily pleased.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Song Lyric Sunday – March 1 2020 – Listen /Hear /Talk /Speak

song-lyric-sundayHere we are again with Jim Adams’ Song Lyric Sunday where he gives us the chance to share familiar, and sometimes not so familiar, songs. This week he’s asked us to share ORAL or AURAL songs

If you fancy sharing one of your favourite songs you can find out how to participate, and also listen to all the great entries, here.

I’m rather busy this week so my entry will be a very basic affair.

I’m offering a song from one of my favourite groups, The Hollies. The song is called Listen to Me.

“LISTEN TO ME” was recorded in Abbey Road studios, and released in September 1968. The single was #5 in Holland, #10 New Zealand, #11 UK, #13 Germany, #33 Canada, and #129 US. This was the last Hollies single with founding member Graham Nash, who left to form Crosby, Stills & Nash with David Crosby and Stephen Stills.

The video is poor quality I’m afraid, but the words resonate with me greatly. They remind me of my first real love, at a time that I was losing her. I was aged 20. That’s it folks. You can imagine whatever you wish for the rest of the tale.

Listen to Me

The Hollies

Listen to me I’ll sing a song
To change your mind

Have you ever wondered why
When everything goes wrong
Nobody stops to lend a hand
Nobody seems to care
Then she looks you in the eye
And suddenly you’re strong
And very soon you realize
That you didn’t care about love

Listen to me I’ll sing a song
To change your mind
Your ears are deaf
Your mouth is dumb
Your eyes are blind
Listen to me and very soon
I think you’ll find
Somebody wants to help you
Somebody seems to care
And very soon you’ve forgotten
That you didn’t care about love

Does it hurt to realize
You’ve been acting very strange
Refusing to take the love she gives
Pretending you don’t care
Did it take you by surprise
To discover how you’d changed
How you forgot to remember
That you didn’t care about love

Listen to me I’ll sing a song
To change your mind
Your ears are deaf
Your mouth is dumb,
Your eyes are blind
Listen to me and very soon
I think you’ll find
Somebody wants to help you
Somebody seems to care
And very soon you’ve forgotten
That you didn’t care about love

Listen to me I’ll sing a song
To change your mind
Your ears are deaf
Your mouth is dumb,
Your eyes are blind
Listen to me and very soon
I think you’ll find
Somebody wants to help you
Somebody seems to care
And very soon you’ve forgotten
That you didn’t care about love
You didn’t care about love
You didn’t care about
You didn’t care about
You didn’t care about love

Source: LyricFind

Songwriters: Tony Hazzard

Listen to Me lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

Rapid rhyme #16

Sometimes, just sometimes, I forget that I am a compassionate and caring gentleman. This afternoon was just such an occasion.

 

Would it be awful if I were to say

I cannot be bothered to see you today

I really don’t care that your leg has dropped off

And couldn’t care less you’ve developed a cough

You breed just like rabbits, producing more louts

Your lifestyle’s renowned by all hereabouts

You’re on your seventh partner in only four years

I can only surmise it’ll all end in tears

Please don’t come to me to try to explain

I really don’t wish to hear you complain

It’s hardly surprising the neighbours all glare

Please don’t come to me, I really don’t care!

 

The Knife Angel

We have been experiencing increasing knife crime in the UK, with the majority of cases affecting our young men and boys. Deaths are increasing and there are few towns that have not experienced death or serious injuries. The police have regular knife amnesties, and seize weapons when they find them.

As part of the campaign to draw attention to this useless waste of life and the seriousness of carrying knives, a huge sculpture, made of blades of all shapes and sizes that have been handed in, or seized, has been created. It is called The Knife Angel.

You can read about the Knife Angel here or see the inspiration behind it, its creation, and its current location in Derby in the videos below.

Incidentally, the little map of Derby, shown in the link above, shows MHA “Methodist Homes for the Aged” , where I worked for 17 years prior to retirement.

 

 

My life#6 – The Army -First days

Today is 55 years since I left home to join the Army. Would I do it again?
You bet!

 

Peter's pondering

This, and subsequent “The Army” entries, came about through my Niece requesting some information on my Army days. She was doing some sort of project that required a “behind the scenes” view of military life, so I started to jot things down.

I got a little carried away!

I suppose that this became the precursor to my blog, so I have Penny to thank for that!

I am offering these jottings exactly as originally presented, the only changes being the introduction of badges, where appropriate, and occasional comments, shown in blue.


I joined the Army in 1964, at the age of 16. As I was under the age of majority I had to have my parents’ permission to do so.

Despite the image of the Swinging Sixties you must remember that the majority of youth was unsophisticated, untraveled and, despite what they believed, very naïve. We had not benefitted, or…

View original post 740 more words

I talk to the trees………..

This popped up in my Facebook “memories” today. I thought it may be of interest, even though it is rather a long read.

Peter's pondering

Not only do I talk to the trees, I talk to all manner of things.

Each morning I go for a walk.

I have various routes, but all take in fields, woodland, the River Erewash, the Erewash canal, bridges, a main road, and suburban streets.

Some days I hardly see a living soul, others I see far too many!

My normal route takes me down my road, which has only some 9 houses. At the bottom of the road I have my first conversation, with a brazen hussy who rolls on the ground and will not let me pass before she is satisfied. Somewhere close by her brother will be watching. He is more timid and undemanding. Their Mummy lives at the end house and thinks they are both boys!

I explain that I have to get on, and continue on my way. She follows, then runs ahead. It is…

View original post 1,667 more words

Song Lyric Sunday 11/08/2019 – A song that includes somebody famous in it

img_1345-3Thank you to Jim Adams, who hosts Song Lyric Sunday. He gives us the chance to share familiar, and not so familiar, songs by setting us a challenge each week to submit a song that either fits in with a word, an idea, or specific criteria.

If you fancy sharing one of your favourite songs you can find out how to participate, and also listen to all the great entries, here.

For this week we have to find a song that includes somebody famous.

I think I may be stretching the boundaries a little here. I’m not even sure that my inclusion can be called “somebody”! Is it a man? A woman? An entity? Human? Celestial? An alien?

It depends on your perception, your belief, where you live in the world, how you were brought up, what has happened to you since.

It is a song from The Beach Boys album Pet Sounds, released in July 1966.

Does it include somebody famous?

God Only Knows.

God Only Knows

The Beach Boys

I may not always love you
But long as there are stars above you
You never need to doubt it
I’ll make you so sure about it
God only knows what I’d be without you

If you should ever leave me
Though life would still go on, believe me
The world could show nothing to me
So what good would living do me
God only knows what I’d be without you

God only knows what I’d be without you
If you should ever leave me
Though life would still go on, believe me
The world could show nothing to me
So what good would living do me
God only knows what I’d be without you

God only knows what I’d be without you
God only knows what I’d be without you
God only knows what I’d be without you
God only knows what I’d be without you (God only knows)
God only knows what I’d be without you (what I’d be without you)
God only knows what I’d be without you (God only knows)
God only knows what I’d be without you (what I’d be without you)
God only knows what I’d be without you (God only knows)
God only knows what I’d be without you (what I’d be without you)
God only knows what I’d be without you (God only knows)
God only knows what I’d be without you (what I’d be without you)
God only knows what I’d be without you

Source: LyricFind

Songwriters: Brian Douglas Wilson / Tony Asher

God Only Knows lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, Warner Chappell Music, Inc, Universal Music Publishing Group

This holds very fond memories for me as a special song for me and my first “true” love, Susan Margaret Wood. As I had left home at age 16, in 1964, to join the army, and left Susan behind, this became “our song” when it first came out!

Here is a version from 20 June 2008.

A version by David Bowie from 1984

and a version from Michael Bublé in 2016

 

 

Song Lyric Sunday 16/06/2019 – Dad /Father /Barbecue

img_1345-3Thank you to Jim Adams, who tirelessly hosts Song Lyric Sunday and gives us the chance to share lots of favourite, and some not so familiar, songs.

The theme for this week, Dad/ Father/ Barbecue, is apt in some ways for anyone in the United Kingdom in that it is Father’s Day, as it is for the vast majority of countries, although not all. However, we are experiencing some pretty awful rainy weather at the moment so you’ll have to forgive me if I pass on the Barbecue!

If you fancy sharing one of your favourite songs you can find out how to participate, and also listen to all the great entries, here.

Not everyone wants to be a Dad, although, for me, I reckon it is one of the best things in the world.

I consider myself very blessed to have been able to be responsible for my little girl, and to have seen her grow up into a fine young lady, and to get married to a marvellous, loving, and caring husband. So, to celebrate that fact, I have chosen to share with you Daddy’s Little Girl written by Robert Burke and Horace Gerlach in 1949, and recorded by Steve Conway, in 1950.

Steve was one of Britain’s leading 20th Century popular singers. Born Walter James Groom in Bethnal Green, on 20 October 1920, he came from a very poor East End family. He began his singing career in local talent contests before being spotted by Reg Morgan and Charlie Chester (it was Chester who originated the stage name Steve Conway). Together they ran the Victory Publishing Company and managed to get Conway an audition for the BBC. Steve Conway appeared on several BBC shows and also began to appear on the club circuit, singing for such orchestras as Joe Loss, Maurice Winnink and Lew Stone. As Steve Conway’s career progressed so too did his popularity both in the UK and in America, with celebrities such as Bob Hope seeing Conway live. Arguably his best remembered broadcasts came in the Sunday afternoon series “Sweet Serenade”. Later he broke into post-war television work which began with the variety show “Melody And Mirth”. Steve Conway was plagued with a heart condition for most of his life. He died in London’s Guys Hospital, following surgery, on 19 April 1952, at the age of only 31. His death received wide coverage in both the musical and national press. He was cremated at Golders Green Crematorium on the 25th April following a service at 2:30PM. A congregation of about 100 attended which included bandleaders, vocalists, musicians, recording executives, music publishers, song writers, artistes, agents, managers and reporters. Amongst the many wreaths from fans and stars alike was one from his daughter. It was in the shape of a miniature chair inscribed “Daddy’s Little Girl”, a poignant memory of his hit song.”

Bio by: Kieran Smith

Daddy’s Little Girl

You’re the end of the rainbow, my pot of gold
You’re daddy’s little girl to have and hold
A precious gem is what you are
You’re mommy’s bright and shining star

You’re the spirit of Christmas, my star on the tree
You’re the Easter Bunny to mommy and me
You’re sugar, you’re spice, you’re everything nice
And you’re daddy’s little girl

Little girl of mine with eyes of shining blue
Little girl of mine I love you, yes I do
No one else could be so sweet
You have made my life complete

You’re the end of the rainbow, my pot of gold
You’re daddy’s little girl to have and hold
A precious gem is what you are
You’re mommy’s bright and shining star

You’re the treasure I cherish, so sparkling and bright
You were touched by holy and beautiful light
Like angels that sing, a heavenly thing
And you’re daddy’s little girl

I am adding links to alternative versions below. The Mills Brothers recording is particularly good, but there are very many versions and the song has become quite a popular Father/Daughter first dance at weddings.

The Mills Brothers

Al Martino

Michael Bublé